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Mozilla: Colors And Side View, Mission Control, "Facebook Must Do Better"

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Moz/FF
  • How To Enable Firefox’s New Side View And Custom Themes Experiments?

    The features eventually make it to the public release of the web browser. For instance, the built-in Screenshot tool in Firefox was also a part of the test pilot. Recently, Mozilla has made two new additions to Test Pilot: Colors And Side View.

  • Mission Control 1.0

    In general, my hope is that this tool will provide a more scientific and accurate idea of release stability over time. There’s lots more to do, but I think this is a promising start. Much gratitude to kairo, calixte, chutten and others who helped build my understanding of this area.

  • Mozilla: Facebook Must Do Better

    The recent New York Times report alleging expansive data sharing between Facebook and device makers shows that Facebook has a lot of work to do to come clean with its users and to provide transparency into who has their data. We raised these transparency issues with Facebook in March and those concerns drove our decision to pause our advertising on the platform. Despite congressional testimony and major PR campaigns to the contrary, Facebook apparently has yet to fundamentally address these issues.

  • My 15th Bugzilla account anniversary

    Exactly 15 years ago at “2003-06-05 09:51:47 PDT” my journey in Bugzilla started. At that time when I created my account I would never have imagined where all these endless hours of community work ended-up. And even now I cannot predict how it will look like in another 15 years…

  • Announcing Rust 1.26.2

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.26.2. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

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They don't make 'em like they used to, do they? Video games, I mean. Sure, there's a bit more grunt in the gear now. Princess Zelda used to be 16 pixels in each direction; there's now enough graphics power for every hair on her head. Today's processors could beat up 1988's processors in a cage-fight deathmatch without breaking a sweat. But you know what's missing? The fun. You've got a squillion and one buttons to learn just to get past the tutorial mission. There's probably a storyline, too. You shouldn't need a backstory to kill bad guys. All you need is jump and shoot. So, it's little wonder that one of the most enduring popular uses for a Raspberry Pi is to relive the 8- and 16-bit golden age of gaming in the '80s and early '90s. But where to start? Read more

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