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Creating a managed website—Part 1

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HowTos

Do you manage a website? Maybe you’re looking after the site for a small business. Maybe you’re doing it for a community group. Perhaps it’s your own personal site. You’d like it to be dynamic: to have some fresh news every week and a home page that’s always up to date. Therein lies the problem. You’re tired of constantly editing HTML to make these changes. And every change gets more complex as you try to keep the look-and-feel consistent across all the pages. Or maybe the site was developed by an external designer. That shielded you from the technical complexities, but now every change takes time and costs money. Perhaps you need a content management system (CMS)...

Do I need a CMS?

A CMS can insulate you from the technical complexities of updating content. Rather than having to learn HTML editors and manage FTP protocols, you can get back to what you want to do—use simple editing tools to create up-to-date, well-presented content for your audience.

Full Story.


Recently this site was updated to avoid a potential security weakness. This article briefly describes the problem which was fixed, and explains some of the most common online security problems.

Introduction

This article was inspired by recent comments from dkg about a potential security hole present in the code behind this website.

The hole described was new to me and I think it is worth sharing in the interests of full-disclosure, credit to Daniel Gillmor, and hopefully the securing of more sites.

Improving website security.

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