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Creating a managed website—Part 1

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HowTos

Do you manage a website? Maybe you’re looking after the site for a small business. Maybe you’re doing it for a community group. Perhaps it’s your own personal site. You’d like it to be dynamic: to have some fresh news every week and a home page that’s always up to date. Therein lies the problem. You’re tired of constantly editing HTML to make these changes. And every change gets more complex as you try to keep the look-and-feel consistent across all the pages. Or maybe the site was developed by an external designer. That shielded you from the technical complexities, but now every change takes time and costs money. Perhaps you need a content management system (CMS)...

Do I need a CMS?

A CMS can insulate you from the technical complexities of updating content. Rather than having to learn HTML editors and manage FTP protocols, you can get back to what you want to do—use simple editing tools to create up-to-date, well-presented content for your audience.

Full Story.


Recently this site was updated to avoid a potential security weakness. This article briefly describes the problem which was fixed, and explains some of the most common online security problems.

Introduction

This article was inspired by recent comments from dkg about a potential security hole present in the code behind this website.

The hole described was new to me and I think it is worth sharing in the interests of full-disclosure, credit to Daniel Gillmor, and hopefully the securing of more sites.

Improving website security.

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Apple privacy policy frustrates government

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10 Android Smartphone Alternatives to the Apple iPhone 6

Apple might not have the most mobile market share or sell the most units, but it can get more attention than any other mobile device maker. Year after year, it's able to build anticipation for its latest products to a fever pitch. That has become abundantly apparent in the wake of the iPhone 6 launch. While there are still countless devices available that might in one way or another top the iPhone 6 in terms of features or price, it's Apple's product that generates the most hype. But now that the iPhone 6 is shipping, consumers who aren't already totally committed to Apple's products will go back to calmly considering in the clear light of day which product offers the best deal—the iPhone or one of the many handsets that run Android. This eWEEK slide show looks at 10 Android smartphones ranging from lower-cost units to the top-of-the-line flagship models that might prove to be suitable alternatives to the iPhone. From the Samsung Galaxy S5 to the Amazon Fire Phone, there are Android handsets that can suit any mobile phone buyer's needs. Read more

The Features Coming For Fedora 21

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Bullies in the Machine or Pick On Someone Your Own Size

It wasn’t but a few days ago that I approached the KDE community in Google Plus to ask a question. In asking that question, I included a screenshot to present a graphical representation of my problem. Three community members responded right away. The first two responses were legitimate queries: questions seeking to gather information needed to calculate an effective attack vector. The third response was…well, not so much. “Stop, I can’t. My eyes are bleeding. x_x “ The remark about “eyes bleeding” was obviously a reaction to a perceived lack of aesthetics in the screenshot. And yeah, it pissed me off. I didn’t seek a critique on my icon set or color scheme. I was asking how to fix my friggin’ frappin’ problem. Read more