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today's leftovers

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  • Huawei announces the EROFS Linux file system intended for Android devices

    A file system is a technology that outlines how data is stored and retrieved. There are many different kinds of file systems, each with their own benefits, to pick from. You’ve probably heard of file systems like exFAT, F2FS, ext4. Choosing one file system over another can have profound impacts on storage performance and stability, so the decision isn’t taken lightly by device makers. Most device makers settle with the popular, well-tested file systems like ext4, but that doesn’t mean companies aren’t willing to experiment with alternatives. That’s exactly what Huawei is doing with an open-source Linux file-system called EROFS, which is intended to be used on Android devices at some point.

  • Microsoft’s Windows shakeup continues internally

     

    The organizational changes mean that Joe Belfiore, who has been the face of Windows Phone in the past, is taking on more of the important consumer-facing parts of Windows. Rajesh Jha, previously an Office executive, will be leading the overall experiences and devices team, and in a memo to employees he says the changes will “bring end to end accountability for Edge, Windows experience, and partners together.”

  • Help Celebrate The 14th Birthday Of Phoronix Next Week

    Now at nearly 14 years old, Phoronix.com has provided more than 25,200 original news articles and more than 3,800 featured articles / Linux hardware reviews.

  • Linux Journal June Issue: Do-It-Yourself
  • Free Resources for Open Source Leadership, AI, Networking, and More

    May was the month for learning at Linux.com and The Linux Foundation, and we covered a range of topics and offered an array of free resources to help you expand your knowledge of Linux and open source. Let’s take a look at some of the month’s most popular content.

  • Here’s What You Missed at openSUSE Conference 2018

    The annual openSUSE Conference is always an exciting event for the SUSE Linux community. This year the event took place in Prague from the 25th to the 27th of May. It’s FOSS was the official media partner of the event and I attended the event on behalf of the It’s FOSS team.

    If you did not follow my daily debriefing on Facebook or LinkedIn, here is a summary of the three-day event as I lived it, all condensed in a single article.

  • Debian 7 Long Term Support reaching end-of-life

    The Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Team hereby announces that Debian 7 "Wheezy" support has reached its end-of-life on May 31, 2018, five years after its initial release on May 4, 2013.

    Debian will not provide further security updates for Debian 7. A subset of Wheezy packages will be supported by external parties. Detailed information can be found at Extended LTS.

    The LTS Team will prepare the transition to Debian 8 "Jessie", which is the current oldstable release. The LTS team will take over support from the Security Team on June 17, 2018.

  • Atari VCS Finally on Indiegogo, Free Software Directory Meet-up Tomorrow, Minifree Libreboot X200 Tablet Has Been FSF-Certified and More

    Redis 5.0 RC1 is out for testing this week, Phoronix reports. The biggest new feature is the Streams data type implementation, but 5.0 also offers new APIs, better memory reporting and more. See the Redis 5.0 RC1 announcement for all the details.

  • Microsoft Plans To Buy GitHub, Valued At $2 Billion: Report

    If the rumors turn out to be true, web-based code hosting service GitHub could become a part of Microsoft. Business Insider, citing sources, reports that Microsoft is reportedly in talks to buy GitHub.

  • FundRequest launches a marketplace that rewards developers for Open Source contributions

    FundRequest, a new platform for incentivizing open-source development, has officially launched their first product: a blockchain powered integration with GitHub that allows developers to directly solve open source project issues and be rewarded. The platform integrates directly with GitHub, allowing projects to fund ‘issues’ that developers can solve and be rewarded in cryptocurrency.

  • Intel Has Another Developer Working Now Working On FreeBSD Support

    Ben Widawsky, one of the Linux graphics architects at Intel where he has been working on the Mesa driver stack for the past eight years, is now re-tasking to FreeBSD.

  • Photo FOMO: $5 photography insurance, a sleek, open-source 3D-printed camera

    Afraid of missing out on the latest photo industry news while you’re out, well, actually taking pictures? Photo FOMO (you know, Fear Of Missing Out) is all the news you might have missed this week, published on the weekends. Alongside the biggest stories of the week, like the end of Canon’s film camera era, PicsArt’s custom stickers and the availability of DJI’s latest stabilizer, find briefs on the latest in accessories and photo industry news from this week with Photo FOMO.

  • Summer of Code: Command Line OX Client!

    As I stated earlier, I am working on a small XMPP command line test client, which is capable of sending and receiving OpenPGP encrypted messages. I just published a first version Smile

    Creating command line clients with Smack is super easy. You basically just create a connection, instantiate the manager classes of features you want to use and create some kind of read-execute-print-loop.
    Last year I demonstrated how to create an OMEMO-capable client in 200 lines of code. The new client follows pretty much the same scheme.

More in Tux Machines

It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER. Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open. Read more

Perl 5.28.0 released

Version 5.28.0 of the Perl language has been released. "Perl 5.28.0 represents approximately 13 months of development since Perl 5.26.0 and contains approximately 730,000 lines of changes across 2,200 files from 77 authors". The full list of changes can be found over here; some highlights include Unicode 10.0 support, string- and number-specific bitwise operators, a change to more secure hash functions, and safer in-place editing. Read more

Today in Techrights

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats. In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts. When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company. The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services. With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development. Read more