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today's leftovers

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  • Huawei announces the EROFS Linux file system intended for Android devices

    A file system is a technology that outlines how data is stored and retrieved. There are many different kinds of file systems, each with their own benefits, to pick from. You’ve probably heard of file systems like exFAT, F2FS, ext4. Choosing one file system over another can have profound impacts on storage performance and stability, so the decision isn’t taken lightly by device makers. Most device makers settle with the popular, well-tested file systems like ext4, but that doesn’t mean companies aren’t willing to experiment with alternatives. That’s exactly what Huawei is doing with an open-source Linux file-system called EROFS, which is intended to be used on Android devices at some point.

  • Microsoft’s Windows shakeup continues internally

     

    The organizational changes mean that Joe Belfiore, who has been the face of Windows Phone in the past, is taking on more of the important consumer-facing parts of Windows. Rajesh Jha, previously an Office executive, will be leading the overall experiences and devices team, and in a memo to employees he says the changes will “bring end to end accountability for Edge, Windows experience, and partners together.”

  • Help Celebrate The 14th Birthday Of Phoronix Next Week

    Now at nearly 14 years old, Phoronix.com has provided more than 25,200 original news articles and more than 3,800 featured articles / Linux hardware reviews.

  • Linux Journal June Issue: Do-It-Yourself
  • Free Resources for Open Source Leadership, AI, Networking, and More

    May was the month for learning at Linux.com and The Linux Foundation, and we covered a range of topics and offered an array of free resources to help you expand your knowledge of Linux and open source. Let’s take a look at some of the month’s most popular content.

  • Here’s What You Missed at openSUSE Conference 2018

    The annual openSUSE Conference is always an exciting event for the SUSE Linux community. This year the event took place in Prague from the 25th to the 27th of May. It’s FOSS was the official media partner of the event and I attended the event on behalf of the It’s FOSS team.

    If you did not follow my daily debriefing on Facebook or LinkedIn, here is a summary of the three-day event as I lived it, all condensed in a single article.

  • Debian 7 Long Term Support reaching end-of-life

    The Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Team hereby announces that Debian 7 "Wheezy" support has reached its end-of-life on May 31, 2018, five years after its initial release on May 4, 2013.

    Debian will not provide further security updates for Debian 7. A subset of Wheezy packages will be supported by external parties. Detailed information can be found at Extended LTS.

    The LTS Team will prepare the transition to Debian 8 "Jessie", which is the current oldstable release. The LTS team will take over support from the Security Team on June 17, 2018.

  • Atari VCS Finally on Indiegogo, Free Software Directory Meet-up Tomorrow, Minifree Libreboot X200 Tablet Has Been FSF-Certified and More

    Redis 5.0 RC1 is out for testing this week, Phoronix reports. The biggest new feature is the Streams data type implementation, but 5.0 also offers new APIs, better memory reporting and more. See the Redis 5.0 RC1 announcement for all the details.

  • Microsoft Plans To Buy GitHub, Valued At $2 Billion: Report

    If the rumors turn out to be true, web-based code hosting service GitHub could become a part of Microsoft. Business Insider, citing sources, reports that Microsoft is reportedly in talks to buy GitHub.

  • FundRequest launches a marketplace that rewards developers for Open Source contributions

    FundRequest, a new platform for incentivizing open-source development, has officially launched their first product: a blockchain powered integration with GitHub that allows developers to directly solve open source project issues and be rewarded. The platform integrates directly with GitHub, allowing projects to fund ‘issues’ that developers can solve and be rewarded in cryptocurrency.

  • Intel Has Another Developer Working Now Working On FreeBSD Support

    Ben Widawsky, one of the Linux graphics architects at Intel where he has been working on the Mesa driver stack for the past eight years, is now re-tasking to FreeBSD.

  • Photo FOMO: $5 photography insurance, a sleek, open-source 3D-printed camera

    Afraid of missing out on the latest photo industry news while you’re out, well, actually taking pictures? Photo FOMO (you know, Fear Of Missing Out) is all the news you might have missed this week, published on the weekends. Alongside the biggest stories of the week, like the end of Canon’s film camera era, PicsArt’s custom stickers and the availability of DJI’s latest stabilizer, find briefs on the latest in accessories and photo industry news from this week with Photo FOMO.

  • Summer of Code: Command Line OX Client!

    As I stated earlier, I am working on a small XMPP command line test client, which is capable of sending and receiving OpenPGP encrypted messages. I just published a first version Smile

    Creating command line clients with Smack is super easy. You basically just create a connection, instantiate the manager classes of features you want to use and create some kind of read-execute-print-loop.
    Last year I demonstrated how to create an OMEMO-capable client in 200 lines of code. The new client follows pretty much the same scheme.

More in Tux Machines

Vista 10: Embrace, Now Extend

  • WLinux: Windows 10 Gets Its Own Exclusive Linux Distro
    Ubuntu, Debian, and Kali are some of the popular Linux distros available out there for Windows Subsystem for Linux. But, most of these distros contain packages that are irrelevant to WSL and lack development tools. How about a distro that is optimized specially for Windows 10?
  • New Linux Distro Created Specifically for Windows 10
    The Windows Subsystem for Linux allows users to run Linux distributions on top of Windows 10, and at this point, there are already several choices for users who want to try out this feature. In addition to Ubuntu, Debian, and Kali, beginning today, Windows 10 adopters are provided with a new Linux distro that’s specifically optimized for the WSL. Called WLinux, this new Linux distro is focused on the packages that are relevant to WSL, as well as the customizations to take full advantage of this Windows 10 feature.

Review: Bodhi Linux 5.0.0

Sometimes when reviewing an operating system it is difficult to separate the question "Is this a good distribution?" from "Is this a good distribution for me?" Bodhi is one of those projects where the answers to these questions are quite different, mostly over matters of style rather than functionality. On a personal level, I don't think I would ever be inclined to use Bodhi myself because I don't like the Moksha/Enlightenment style of desktop. It does a lot of little things differently (not badly, just differently) from other open source desktops and its style is not one I ever seem to find comfortable. This, combined with the streamlined, web-based AppCenter and unusual settings panel, makes Bodhi a distribution which always feels a bit alien to me. Let's put aside my personal style preferences though and try to look at the distribution objectively. Bodhi is trying to provide a lightweight, visually attractive distribution with a wide range of hardware support. It manages to do all of these things and do them well. The distribution is paying special attention to lower-end hardware, including 32-bit systems, and maintains a remarkably small memory footprint given the amount of functionality and eye candy included. Most lightweight distributions sacrifice quite a bit visually in order to provide the lightest interface possible, but Bodhi does a nice job of balancing low resource requirements with an attractive desktop environment. Bodhi is pleasantly easy to install, thanks to the Ubiquity installer, has a minimal collection of software (in the main edition) that allows us to craft our own experience and, for people who need more applications out of the box, there is the AppPack edition. All of this is to say that, for me personally, I spent more time that I would have liked this week searching through settings, trying to get used to how Moksha's panel works, tracking down less popular applications and re-learning when to use right-click versus left-click on the desktop. But, objectively, I would be hard pressed to name another distribution that more elegantly offers a lightweight desktop with visual effects, or that offers such easy access to both legacy and modern hardware support. In short, I think Bodhi Linux is a good distribution for those who want to get the most performance out of their operating system without sacrificing hardware support or the appearance of the interface. There are a few little glitches here and there, but sothing show-stopping and, overall, Bodhi is a well put together distribution. Read more

Android Leftovers

5 ways to play old-school games on a Raspberry Pi

They don't make 'em like they used to, do they? Video games, I mean. Sure, there's a bit more grunt in the gear now. Princess Zelda used to be 16 pixels in each direction; there's now enough graphics power for every hair on her head. Today's processors could beat up 1988's processors in a cage-fight deathmatch without breaking a sweat. But you know what's missing? The fun. You've got a squillion and one buttons to learn just to get past the tutorial mission. There's probably a storyline, too. You shouldn't need a backstory to kill bad guys. All you need is jump and shoot. So, it's little wonder that one of the most enduring popular uses for a Raspberry Pi is to relive the 8- and 16-bit golden age of gaming in the '80s and early '90s. But where to start? Read more