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today's leftovers

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  • Huawei announces the EROFS Linux file system intended for Android devices

    A file system is a technology that outlines how data is stored and retrieved. There are many different kinds of file systems, each with their own benefits, to pick from. You’ve probably heard of file systems like exFAT, F2FS, ext4. Choosing one file system over another can have profound impacts on storage performance and stability, so the decision isn’t taken lightly by device makers. Most device makers settle with the popular, well-tested file systems like ext4, but that doesn’t mean companies aren’t willing to experiment with alternatives. That’s exactly what Huawei is doing with an open-source Linux file-system called EROFS, which is intended to be used on Android devices at some point.

  • Microsoft’s Windows shakeup continues internally

     

    The organizational changes mean that Joe Belfiore, who has been the face of Windows Phone in the past, is taking on more of the important consumer-facing parts of Windows. Rajesh Jha, previously an Office executive, will be leading the overall experiences and devices team, and in a memo to employees he says the changes will “bring end to end accountability for Edge, Windows experience, and partners together.”

  • Help Celebrate The 14th Birthday Of Phoronix Next Week

    Now at nearly 14 years old, Phoronix.com has provided more than 25,200 original news articles and more than 3,800 featured articles / Linux hardware reviews.

  • Linux Journal June Issue: Do-It-Yourself
  • Free Resources for Open Source Leadership, AI, Networking, and More

    May was the month for learning at Linux.com and The Linux Foundation, and we covered a range of topics and offered an array of free resources to help you expand your knowledge of Linux and open source. Let’s take a look at some of the month’s most popular content.

  • Here’s What You Missed at openSUSE Conference 2018

    The annual openSUSE Conference is always an exciting event for the SUSE Linux community. This year the event took place in Prague from the 25th to the 27th of May. It’s FOSS was the official media partner of the event and I attended the event on behalf of the It’s FOSS team.

    If you did not follow my daily debriefing on Facebook or LinkedIn, here is a summary of the three-day event as I lived it, all condensed in a single article.

  • Debian 7 Long Term Support reaching end-of-life

    The Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Team hereby announces that Debian 7 "Wheezy" support has reached its end-of-life on May 31, 2018, five years after its initial release on May 4, 2013.

    Debian will not provide further security updates for Debian 7. A subset of Wheezy packages will be supported by external parties. Detailed information can be found at Extended LTS.

    The LTS Team will prepare the transition to Debian 8 "Jessie", which is the current oldstable release. The LTS team will take over support from the Security Team on June 17, 2018.

  • Atari VCS Finally on Indiegogo, Free Software Directory Meet-up Tomorrow, Minifree Libreboot X200 Tablet Has Been FSF-Certified and More

    Redis 5.0 RC1 is out for testing this week, Phoronix reports. The biggest new feature is the Streams data type implementation, but 5.0 also offers new APIs, better memory reporting and more. See the Redis 5.0 RC1 announcement for all the details.

  • Microsoft Plans To Buy GitHub, Valued At $2 Billion: Report

    If the rumors turn out to be true, web-based code hosting service GitHub could become a part of Microsoft. Business Insider, citing sources, reports that Microsoft is reportedly in talks to buy GitHub.

  • FundRequest launches a marketplace that rewards developers for Open Source contributions

    FundRequest, a new platform for incentivizing open-source development, has officially launched their first product: a blockchain powered integration with GitHub that allows developers to directly solve open source project issues and be rewarded. The platform integrates directly with GitHub, allowing projects to fund ‘issues’ that developers can solve and be rewarded in cryptocurrency.

  • Intel Has Another Developer Working Now Working On FreeBSD Support

    Ben Widawsky, one of the Linux graphics architects at Intel where he has been working on the Mesa driver stack for the past eight years, is now re-tasking to FreeBSD.

  • Photo FOMO: $5 photography insurance, a sleek, open-source 3D-printed camera

    Afraid of missing out on the latest photo industry news while you’re out, well, actually taking pictures? Photo FOMO (you know, Fear Of Missing Out) is all the news you might have missed this week, published on the weekends. Alongside the biggest stories of the week, like the end of Canon’s film camera era, PicsArt’s custom stickers and the availability of DJI’s latest stabilizer, find briefs on the latest in accessories and photo industry news from this week with Photo FOMO.

  • Summer of Code: Command Line OX Client!

    As I stated earlier, I am working on a small XMPP command line test client, which is capable of sending and receiving OpenPGP encrypted messages. I just published a first version Smile

    Creating command line clients with Smack is super easy. You basically just create a connection, instantiate the manager classes of features you want to use and create some kind of read-execute-print-loop.
    Last year I demonstrated how to create an OMEMO-capable client in 200 lines of code. The new client follows pretty much the same scheme.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: C++, Python and In-house OpenJDK Implementation of Alibaba

  • Next C++ workshop: Pointers and Linked Lists, 28 March at 19:00 UTC
    Another workshop is coming up! Improve your C++ skills with the help of LibreOffice developers: we’re running regular workshops which focus on a specific topic, and are accompanied by a real-time IRC meeting. For the next one, the topics are Pointers and Linked Lists. Start by watching this presentation:
  • Python programming language: Pyboard D-series arrives for MicroPython robots
    The new Pyboard D-series micro-controller is now available for purchase at a rather hefty price of £43 ($56), offering developers a low-powered device for running programs created with MicroPython, a stripped-back version of the hugely popular Python 3 programming language.
  • Commenting Python Code
    Programming reflects your way of thinking in order to describe the single steps that you took to solve a problem using a computer. Commenting your code helps explain your thought process, and helps you and others to understand later on the intention of your code. This allows you to more easily find errors, to fix them, to improve the code later on, and to reuse it in other applications as well. Commenting is important to all kinds of projects, no matter whether they are - small, medium, or rather large. It is an essential part of your workflow, and is seen as good practice for developers. Without comments, things can get confusing, real fast. In this article we will explain the various methods of commenting Python supports, and how it can be used to automatically create documentation for your code using the so-called module-level docstrings.
  • Documenting Python Projects With Sphinx and Read The Docs
  • Django Migrations 101
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #361 (March 26, 2019)
  • MongoDB connections
  • Alibaba Dragonwell8 : The In-house OpenJDK Implementation At Alibaba
    Alibaba requires no introduction. It is one of the popular and largest multinational conglomerate founded by Jack Ma, a business magnate and philanthropist from China. It is also world’s fifth-largest internet company by revenue. It specializes in various sectors such as e-commerce, retail, Internet and technology. Alibaba team has provided significant contribution to open source projects. One such project is OpenJDK. The development team at Alibaba has developed many Java-based applications over the years. They have adopted OpenJDK and created their own JDK named “Alibaba Dragonwell8”. It is the downstream version of OpenJDK and completely open source. Alibaba Dragonwell is optimized for developing e-commerce, financial, logistics applications which are running on their 100k+ servers. It is certified as compatible with the Java SE standard. It is currently supports Linux/x86_64 platform only. Let us hope they will extend the support to Unix and other platforms soon. In this guide, we will see how to install Alibaba Dragonwell8 in Linux. I have tested this guide on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS server. However, it should work on other Linux distributions as well.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages. Read more

Why We Need Our Nonprofits

SPARC was at best a relatively small success. But RISC did succeed, massively, with ARM (which stands for Advanced RISC Machine). ARM started as the Acorn RISC Machine in 1983. Today, most of the world's mobile devices run ARM chips. I don't know how well the CHIPS Alliance will do, but I do know that only an entity big and experienced enough to pull giant competing companies together can do it. For Linux, that's the Linux Foundation. I'm glad we have it. I'm also glad we have the Software Freedom Conservancy. Times are getting tough for FLOSS, and we need all the help we can get. Read more

See GNOME 3.32 on Ubuntu 19.04 Beta

Although the 19.04 is still not officially released this March, but even today we can download the development version and run it (LiveCD) on our computer. We find that it includes the 3.32, the latest version of GNOME desktop environment. I want to highlight some interesting aspects of it on Ubuntu as we saw it on Fedora Rawhide few days ago. I suggest you to download the 19.04 daily-live ISO and quickly test it, I believe you can feel the performance improvements especially how quick it's now to open the start menu and it's now even quicker to search files on Nautilus. Here we go. Happy testing! Read more