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GNOME: Project of the Week, Room Directory, Pitivi and Bug Tracking versus User Support

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GNOME
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: GNOME

    The GNOME Foundation says the move to GitLab will help improve workflow and tools as well as support, grow and collaborate with other free software communities. The GNOME project consists of more than 400 software projects and about 900 annual contributors.

    The foundation recently announced GNOME 3 with an activities overview to view basic tasks; new productivity features such as search and side-by-side; updated messaging system; performance enhancements; and the ability to access all your data in one place.

  • Improving the performance of the room directory

    For now, when we are searching for rooms with the “Default Servers” option, we are requesting 10 rooms from the homeserver for each protocol (by “protocol”, I mean non-Matrix protocols that are bridged to the user’s home servers, like IRC, Gitter, Slack, etc…) that is bridged to the homeserver. This can be quite slow. For instance, we are fetching about 100 rooms from the homeserver “matrix.org” even if we would need to show to the user only 20 of them. This is really bad regarding the performance of the application, furthermore because we have to download/generate the avatar of each room loaded.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi

    I will be working on Pitivi as my Google Summer of Code 2018 project under GNOME. One of the major task in my project is to integrate the current Welcome dialog box of Pitivi into it’s main window and display projects in a more informative, discoverable, and user friendly layout.

    Currently when Pitivi starts, a Welcome dialog appears that displays the recent projects and some buttons for creating a new project, browsing projects, etc. This dialog box needs to be integrated into the main window.

  • Engineering Journals vs User Support

    A major thanks to everyone involved in the gitlab migration. It’s no doubted a huge leap forward for GNOME on so many fronts.

    Before we lose that momentum, I’d like to bring up in the collective minds of our project, what I consider, a separate problem. That is Bug Tracking versus User Support.

    [...]

    We generally don’t have this focus in F/OSS. It requires a set of skills that many of us have not cultivated and probably should. In addition, we should encourage those that already have these skills to join us.

    But that raises the question: is gitlab the right place to do user support?

    If GNOME were to advance Free Software by taking user support to the next level, what would that look like and what tooling do we need? Is that worth investing in now that we have many applications to support in addition to the desktop plumbing?

    Hopefully we can have some discussion about that on the beach in Almería, Spain for GUADEC 2018.

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