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GNOME: GUADEC, Fractal and GSoC

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GNOME
  • GUADEC under the sea

    I’m planning to do a day trip to go scuba diving at GUADEC this year. If you’d like to join me, drop me an email or find me on IRC. There’s a few of us interested in going, so the more, the better! This is not an official GUADEC event.

  • Redesigning the room directory of Fractal

    I have been working on the redesign of the room directory since I finished my first task. In this article, I will talk about the room directory (how it works and which improvements was needed), what I have done to improve it and some of the issues that are yet to be solved.

  • Fractal: a GNOME Matrix chat client

    Matrix is a protocol for decentralized instant messaging that has recently grown in popularity. Matrix can be used for a wide range of communication tasks, such as group chats, video chats, sharing files, and bridging to existing IRC rooms. One of the easiest ways to use Matrix is the RiotIM web client or desktop application. However, Fractal is a Matrix desktop application designed for GNOME, so it arguably feels a lot more at home on Fedora Workstation, as seen here:

  • [Old] How I got drawn into GSoC 2018?
  • [Old] Simple and robust algorithm for video thumbnail generation

    The simplest algorithm that comes to mind for generating a thumbnail for a video is to randomly pick a frame in the video (even simpler could be to just pick the first frame of the video). While the algorithm is very intuitive and looks good at first glance, it has one problem – it can pick a monotonous frame, like an all black frame, which obviously is not a good thumbnail because it doesn’t convey any information regarding the video.

    A good heuristic algorithm (referred from this stackoverflow post) to tackle this problem is to select a few random frames (let say, 5) in the video and pick the frame that has largest file size as video thumbnail – the idea being that the JPEG of a monotonous frame will compress into much smaller file than that of an interesting frame (one with lots of objects and colors).

  • A summer with GNOME

    Within just a few days, I fell in love with the simplicity of the code and the very supportive community of GNOME. My mentors, Ardien Plazas and Abhinav Singh were especially helpful and helped me get on track, by closely watching them handle the code with utmost care and simplicity, it quickly began apparent to me that more than developing a software, they were developing an art. I promptly began to understand the codebase and fix bugs as fast as I could. Encouraged by my friend, Sagar and already in love with GNOME Games, I applied for GSoC.

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