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Variscite launches a System on Module with i.MX 6QuadPlus Proces

The global System on Module company, Variscite announced the launch of the enhanced VAR-SOM-MX6 System-on-Module.
The highly versatile SoM has been upgraded to support NXP’s i.MX 6QuadPlus processor, in addition to the existing scalable configuration options: i.MX 6 Solo/DualLite/Dual/Quad, with up to 1200MHz ARM Cortex-A9 processor.

The i.MX 6QuadPlus processor delivers the highest levels of graphics performance and DDR bandwidth in the i.MX 6 family, enhancing the Vivante™ GC2000 2D/3D Graphics Accelerator performance by 50% compared to the i.MX 6Quad Processor. Combined with High Definition H.264 Decode and Encode, those enhancements establish the VAR-SOM-MX6 platform as a highly recommended solution for graphics-intensive and high-performance multimedia applications.

The enhanced VAR-SOM-MX6 is pin-compatible with all existing VAR-SOM-MX6 Core configurations Solo/DualLite/Dual/Quad processor, as well as with the VAR-SOM-SOLO/DUAL SoM. This grants a full scalability on both iMX6 and Variscite’s upcoming iMX8 System on Module solutions.

This versatile System on Module features up to 4x Arm Cortex-A9 up to 1.2 GHz per core, -40 to 85 °C temperature range, Dual CAN support and certified WiFi/BT module including optional Dual Band 2.4 / 5 GHz and MIMO, making it equally ideal for industrial applications and graphics-intensive applications.

Availability and pricing:

The VAR-SOM-MX6 System on Module and associate evaluation kits are available now for orders in production quantities, starting from 52 USD per unit.

VAR-SOM-MX6 main features:

• NXP i.MX6 1.2MHz Solo/DualLite/Dual/Quad/QuadPlus Cortex-A9
• Up to 4GB DDR3, 1GB NAND and 64GB eMMC
• 1080p60 H.264 Decode, 1080p30 H.264 Encode
• Certified Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n 2.4 / 5GHz with optional 2×2 MIMO
• 4.1 + CSA2 support / BLE
• Vivante GPU 2D/3D graphics accelerator (QuadPlus configuration delivers 50% enhanced performance)
• Display: 2x LVDS, HDMI1.4, MIPI DSI
• USB 2.0: Host, OTG
• 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet
• PCIe, SATA
• Audio In/Out
• Dual CAN, UART, I2C, SPI
• Camera inputs: MIPI CSI, parallel
• Industrial temperature -40 to 85°C
• OS: Linux, Android

About Variscite
Variscite designs, develops and manufactures a range of Systems on Modules, consistently setting benchmarks in terms of performance, price and innovation. Today, Variscite is one of the leading SoM vendors, servicing thousands of satisfied customers worldwide. With the launch of their new SoM configuration, the company continues to live up to this reputation on innovation.
Visit Variscite's website: https://www.variscite.com/
Contact us by email sales@variscite.com

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Linux - The beginning of the end

You should never swear at people under you - I use the word under in the hierarchical sense. Colleagues? Well, probably not, although you should never hold back on your opinion. Those above you in the food chain? It's fair game. You risk it to biscuit it. I say, Linus shouldn't have used the language he did in about 55-65% of the cases. In those 55-65% of the cases, he swore at people when he should have focused on swearing at the technical solution. The thing is, people can make bad products but that does not make them bad people. It is important to distinguish this. People often forget this. And yes, sometimes, there is genuine malice. My experience shows that malice usually comes with a smile and lots of sloganeering. The typical corporate setup is an excellent breeding ground for the aspiring ladder climber. Speaking of Linus, it is also vital to remember that the choice of language does not always define people, especially when there are cultural differences - it's their actions. In the remainder of the cases where "bad" language was used (if we judge it based on the approved corporate lingo vocab), the exchange was completely impersonal - or personal from the start on all sides - in which case, it's a different game. The problem is, it's the whole package. You don't selective get to pick a person's attributes. Genius comes with its flaws. If Linus was an extroverted stage speaker who liked to gushy-mushy chitchat and phrase work problems in empty statements full of "inspiring" and "quotable" one-liners, he probably wouldn't be the developer that he is, and we wouldn't have Linux. So was he wrong in some of those cases? Yes. Should he have apologized? Yes, privately, because it's a private matter. Definitely not the way it was done. Not a corporate-approved kangaroo court. The outcome of this story is disturbing. A public, humiliating apology is just as bad. It's part of the wider corporate show, where you say how sorry you are on screen (the actual remorse is irrelevant). Linus might actually be sorry, and he might actually be seeking to improve his communication style - empathy won't be part of that equation, I guarantee that. But this case - and a few similar ones - set a precedence. People will realize, if someone like Linus gets snubbed for voicing his opinion - and that's what it is after all, an opinion, regardless of the choice of words and expletives - how will they be judged if they do something similar. But not just judged. Placed in the (social) media spotlight and asked to dance to a tune of fake humility in order to satisfy the public thirst for theatrics. You are not expected to just feel remorse. You need to do a whole stage grovel. And once the seed of doubt creeps in, people start normalizing. It's a paradox that it's the liberal, democratic societies that are putting so much strain on the freedom of communication and speech. People forget the harsh lessons of the past and the bloody struggles their nations went through to ensure people could freely express themselves. Now, we're seeing a partial reversal. But it's happening. The basket of "not allowed" words is getting bigger by the day. This affects how people talk, how they frame their issues, how they express themselves. This directly affects their work. There is less and less distinction between professional disagreement and personal slight. In fact, people deliberately blur the lines so they can present their business ineptitude as some sort of Dreyfuss witchhunt against their glorious selves. As an ordinary person slaving in an office so you can pay your bills and raise your mediocre children, you may actually not want to say something that may be construed as "offensive" even though it could be a legitimate complaint, related to your actual work. This leads to self-censored, mind-numbing normalization. People just swallow their pride, suppress their problems, focus on the paycheck, and just play the life-draining corporate game. Or they have an early stroke. Read more Also: Google Keeps Pushing ChromeOS and Android Closer Together