Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Olinux- Everything about Linux

Filed under
Linux

Our goal is to help you solve your computer problems and learn new technologies. We write about things that are in any way related to Linux. This website is updated regularly with high quality content. Content throughout OLinux.net covers the following areas:

Linux and Open-Source
Internet and Network Security
Operating Systems
Ethical Hacking
Internet Trends
Information Technology
and much more cool stuff

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Variscite launches a System on Module with i.MX 6QuadPlus Proces

The global System on Module company, Variscite announced the launch of the enhanced VAR-SOM-MX6 System-on-Module.
The highly versatile SoM has been upgraded to support NXP’s i.MX 6QuadPlus processor, in addition to the existing scalable configuration options: i.MX 6 Solo/DualLite/Dual/Quad, with up to 1200MHz ARM Cortex-A9 processor.

The i.MX 6QuadPlus processor delivers the highest levels of graphics performance and DDR bandwidth in the i.MX 6 family, enhancing the Vivante™ GC2000 2D/3D Graphics Accelerator performance by 50% compared to the i.MX 6Quad Processor. Combined with High Definition H.264 Decode and Encode, those enhancements establish the VAR-SOM-MX6 platform as a highly recommended solution for graphics-intensive and high-performance multimedia applications.

The enhanced VAR-SOM-MX6 is pin-compatible with all existing VAR-SOM-MX6 Core configurations Solo/DualLite/Dual/Quad processor, as well as with the VAR-SOM-SOLO/DUAL SoM. This grants a full scalability on both iMX6 and Variscite’s upcoming iMX8 System on Module solutions.

This versatile System on Module features up to 4x Arm Cortex-A9 up to 1.2 GHz per core, -40 to 85 °C temperature range, Dual CAN support and certified WiFi/BT module including optional Dual Band 2.4 / 5 GHz and MIMO, making it equally ideal for industrial applications and graphics-intensive applications.

Availability and pricing:

The VAR-SOM-MX6 System on Module and associate evaluation kits are available now for orders in production quantities, starting from 52 USD per unit.

VAR-SOM-MX6 main features:

• NXP i.MX6 1.2MHz Solo/DualLite/Dual/Quad/QuadPlus Cortex-A9
• Up to 4GB DDR3, 1GB NAND and 64GB eMMC
• 1080p60 H.264 Decode, 1080p30 H.264 Encode
• Certified Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n 2.4 / 5GHz with optional 2×2 MIMO
• 4.1 + CSA2 support / BLE
• Vivante GPU 2D/3D graphics accelerator (QuadPlus configuration delivers 50% enhanced performance)
• Display: 2x LVDS, HDMI1.4, MIPI DSI
• USB 2.0: Host, OTG
• 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet
• PCIe, SATA
• Audio In/Out
• Dual CAN, UART, I2C, SPI
• Camera inputs: MIPI CSI, parallel
• Industrial temperature -40 to 85°C
• OS: Linux, Android

About Variscite
Variscite designs, develops and manufactures a range of Systems on Modules, consistently setting benchmarks in terms of performance, price and innovation. Today, Variscite is one of the leading SoM vendors, servicing thousands of satisfied customers worldwide. With the launch of their new SoM configuration, the company continues to live up to this reputation on innovation.
Visit Variscite's website: https://www.variscite.com/
Contact us by email sales@variscite.com

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Thread Synchronization, Python, C++

  • Thread Synchronization in Linux and Windows Systems, Part 1

    In modern operating systems, each process has its own address space and one thread of control. However, in practice we often face situations requiring several concurrent tasks within a single process and with access to the same process components: structures, open file descriptors, etc.

  • Intro to Black – The Uncompromising Python Code Formatter

    There are several Python code checkers available. For example, a lot of developers enjoy using Pylint or Flake8 to check their code for errors. These tools use static code analysis to check your code for bugs or naming issues. Flake8 will also check your code to see if you are adhering to PEP8, Python’s style guide.

  • Report from the February 2019 ISO C++ meeting (Library)

    Back in February, I attended the WG21 C++ standards committee meeting in rainy Kona, Hawaii (yes, it rained most of the week). This report is so late that we’re now preparing for the next meeting, which will take place mid-July in Cologne. As usual, I spent the majority of my time in the Library Working Group (for LWG; for details on the various Working Groups and Study Groups see Standard C++: The Committee). The purpose of the LWG is to formalize the specification of the C++ Standard Library, i.e. the second “half” of the C++ standard (although in terms of page count it’s closer to three quarters than half). With a new C++20 standard on the horizon, and lots of new features that people want added to the standard library, the LWG has been very busy trying to process the backlog of new proposals forwarded by the Library Evolution Working Group (LEWG). One of the main tasks at the Kona meeting was to review the “Ranges Design Cleanup” proposal. The cleanup involves a number of fixes and improvements to the new Ranges library, addressing issues that came up during the review of the previous (much larger) proposal to add the Ranges library, which is one of the biggest additions to the C++20 library (most of the other significant additions to C++20 affect the core language, without much library impact). In fact, I’d say it’s one of the biggest additions to the C++ standard library since the first standard in 1998. The Ranges library work overhauls the parts of the standard that originated in the Standard Template Library (STL), i.e. iterators, algorithms, and containers, to re-specify them in terms of C++ Concepts. This has been a multi-year effort that has now landed in the C++20 working draft, following multiple proposals and several meetings of wording review by LWG.

  • Save and load Python data with JSON

    JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation. This format is a popular method of storing data in key-value arrangements so it can be parsed easily later. Don’t let the name fool you, though: You can use JSON in Python—not just JavaScript—as an easy way to store data, and this article demonstrates how to get started.

Android Leftovers

SysAdmin Day Sale: Get 60% off on Linux Foundation Certification & Training

To celebrate the Sysadmin day, the Linux Foundation is giving 60% off on its training courses on sysadmin, Kubernetes, Hyperledger etc. Advance your career with these certifications. Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspbian Buster: Hands-On

In my previous two posts I looked at the Raspberry Pi 4 hardware and at the procedure for installing and booting the new Raspbian Buster Operating System on the Pi 4. With those basic steps out of the way, now it's time to look at both the hardware and software in more detail. The first thing I want to mention is that when I wrote the previous post about Raspbian, I had not noticed that there is an updated version of Raspbian Buster (2019-07-10) available. This version was released sort of quietly (without the usual blog post announcing and explaining it), although there are release notes for it if you are interested. This release is extremely good news, because it fixes some of the biggest problems that I mentioned in my previous post... Read more