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Sony PlayStation 3: the Ars Technica review

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Gaming

There it is, sitting in my entertainment center: the PlayStation 3. Getting my PS3 was surprisingly easy—no long preorder line—and when the system was released I arrived at 8:00am and picked it up. Simple. I wasn't shot at and there wasn't a lot of fuss. It sounds like I was one of the lucky ones.

It's just sitting there: a big black monolith with the little light blinking at me. When I took it out of the packaging, I wanted to start singing the theme from 2001.

This is what Sony has been hyping for the past two years, what is supposed to begin the high definition era, and what is intended to destroy the competition. This is the Trojan horse by which Sony hopes to get Blu-ray into as many homes as possible. The stakes are much higher than for a simple gaming system; this is a format war for the home theater of tomorrow. It is also the first time Sony has gotten serious about online play, and they're hoping you're going to want to buy a lot of content through their new system. Sony has a lot riding on the PS3... but you know that already.

Given the long lines, the campouts, and the $600 price tag, the PS3 has high expectations to live up to.

Full Story.

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