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Fedora-Based Korora Linux Takes a Break, No Updates Are Planned in the Future

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Linux
Red Hat

When a new stable Fedora Linux release hits the streets, the Korora development team starts preparing the next major release of their GNU/Linux distribution, based, of course, on the latest Fedora Linux operating system. But not this time, as the Korora team announced they are taking a break from developing the Korora Linux, which won't be getting any updates in the foreseeable future.

"Korora for the foreseeable future is not going to be able to march in cadence with the Fedora releases. In addition to that, for the immediate future, there will be no updates to the Korora distribution," said one of the developers. "So we are taking a little sabbatical to avoid complete burnout and rejuvenate ourselves and our passion for Korora/Fedora and wider open source efforts."

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Also: Void Linux gave itself to the void, Korora needs a long siesta – life is hard for small distros

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