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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • New Technologies Lead to New Linux and Cloud Training Options
  • Everything You Need to Know about the Cloud and Cloud Computing, Part II: Using the Cloud [Ed: Latest cloudwashing by IBM/LJ; just call it what it is: servers being pushed back to a mainframe era -- companies controlling all the servers.]
  • Kakoune: A Better Code Editor Heavily Inspired by Vim

    It comes with numerous text editing/writing tools such as contextual help, syntax highlighting, auto-completion while typing, and supports many different programming languages. It also implements multiple selections as an essential procedure for interacting with your text.

    In addition, Kakoune’s client/server architecture allows for multiple clients to connect to the same editing session.

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  • New in Qt 5.11: improvements to the model/view APIs (part 1)

    The Qt model/view APIs are used throughout Qt — in Qt Widgets, in Qt Quick, as well as in other non-GUI code. As I tell my students when I deliver Qt trainings: mastering the usage of model/view classes and functions is mandatory knowledge, any non-trivial Qt application is going to be data-driven, with the data coming from a model class.

  • Akademy 2019 Call for Hosts

    The organization of this year's Akademy is in full swing: the official conference program is out, we have had an insightful interview with one of the keynote speakers, another is coming soon, and attendees are already booking flights and accommodation. The #akademy IRC channel on Freenode and the Telegram group are buzzing with messages, advice and recommendations.

  • GNOME Is Removing the Ability to Launch Binary Apps from Nautilus

    Last year Nautilus lost the ability to show desktop icons — now GNOME developers plan to drop another familiar feature.

    According to a code commit on Gitlab the famous file manager is set to lose the ability to run binaries and launch apps directly.

    Or, to put it another way, you won’t be able to double-click on programs, scripts or apps to launch them using Nautilus.

  • Mageia Blog (English) : Issues with the Grand Update?

    This should not be needed, as 32-bit libraries should be able to co-exist on a 64 bit install, as they may be needed for third party applications.

    Bug 23016 has been reopened to study this a bit more. For now, we’re watching for reports, and giving you the workaround of uninstalling the 32 bit library.

    It’s not that 32-bit isn’t able to mix with 64-bit in all cases, just in some, where there are files in the lib package that should be in a different (non-arch specific) package. In these two cases, it’s the /usr/share/locale/ files are in both the 32 and 64 bit packages, with identical names and paths.

    The rpm package manager allows a file to be owned by more than one package, provided the attributes are identical, but it blocks updating with a new version, since it’s trying to update one of the packages, but until the other version is updated too, there is a conflict. We’re keeping a watch-out for these packaging errors.

    It’s possible that if you’ve used DNF to do the update, rather than urpmi, you won’t have this problem; as we gather more information, we’ll add it to roundups in the coming weeks.

    While all this Grand stuff has been happening, we’ve also been doing plenty of the usual things, including over 300 packages into Cauldron.

More in Tux Machines

Security: ThreadX, Kali Linux, Rocke and Data Loss

  • Vulnerabilities Found in Highly Popular Firmware for WiFi Chips
    WiFi chip firmware in a variety of devices used mainly for gaming, personal computing, and communication comes with multiple issues. At least some of them could be exploited to run arbitrary code remotely without requiring user interaction. The security flaws were discovered in ThreadX, a real-time operating system (RTOS) developed by Express Logic. The vendor claims on their website that ThreadX has over 6.2 billion deployments, being one of the most popular software powering Wi-Fi chips. The firmware is also powering the Avastar 88W8897 SoC (Wi-Fi + Bluetooth + NFC) from Marvell, present in Sony PlayStation 4 (and its Pro variant), Microsoft Surface (+Pro) tablet and laptop, Xbox One, Samsung Chromebook and smartphones (Galaxy J1), and Valve SteamLink.
  • Wolf Halton on what’s changed in tech and where we are headed
    The tech industry is changing at a massive rate especially after the storage options moved to the cloud. However, this has also given rise to questions on security, data management, change in the work structure within an organization, and much more. Wolf Halton, an expert in Kali Linux, tells us about the security element in the cloud. He also touches upon the skills and knowledge that should be inculcated in your software development cycle in order to adjust to the dynamic tech changes at present and in the future. Following this, he juxtaposes the current software development landscape with the ideal one.
  • Rocke coinminer disables cloud protection agents
    A group of hackers that specializes in infecting servers with cryptocurrency mining software has started disabling security software agents used in cloud environments to evade detection. Known as Rocke in the security industry, the group has been active since at least April 2018 and is known for exploiting critical vulnerabilities in web application frameworks and servers like Apache Struts, Oracle WebLogic and Adobe ColdFusion.
  • Malware used by “Rocke” group evolves to evade detection by cloud security products
  • Malware uninstalls cloud security products from Linux machines
    After removing the cloud security, the malware then proceeded to mine the monero cryptocurrency on its hosts.
  • I Nearly Lost All Of My Data!

    At this point I’m really worried. You see, I cancelled my off-site Amazon Glacier backups around 6 months ago. What are the chances of both a 4 disk RAID failing AND a USB drive at the same time? Not likely, I thought. Boy was I wrong

Solving the Year 2038 problem in the Linux kernel

Because of the way time is represented in Linux, a signed 32-bit number can't support times beyond January 19, 2038 after 3:14:07 UTC. This Year 2038 (Y2038 or Y2K38) problem is about the time data type representation. The solution is to use 64-bit timestamps. I started working on the problem while working as an Outreachy intern for kernel developer Arnd Bergmann. Outreachy is a benevolent program that helps new programmers get into kernel development. The mentors for the kernel projects are usually experienced kernel developers like Arnd. Read more

Booting Linux faster

Of all the computers I've ever owned or used, the one that booted the quickest was from the 1980s; by the time your hand moved from the power switch to the keyboard, the BASIC interpreter was ready for your commands. Modern computers take anywhere from 15 seconds for a laptop to minutes for a small home server to boot. Why is there such a difference in boot times? A microcomputer from the 1980s that booted straight to a BASIC prompt had a very simple CPU that started fetching and executing instructions from a memory address immediately upon getting power. Since these systems had BASIC in ROM, there was no loading time—you got to the BASIC prompt really quickly. More complex systems of that same era, such as the IBM PC or Macintosh, took a significant time to boot (~30 seconds), although this was mostly due to having to read the operating system (OS) off a floppy disk. Only a handful of seconds were spent in firmware before being able to load an OS. Read more

Akira: The Linux Design Tool we’ve always wanted?

Akira wants to create an awesome design tool for Linux that could compete with the likes of Figma, Sketch and Adobe XD. They need your help to achieve this goal. Read more