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Termux turns Android into a Linux development environment

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Android
Linux

Termux is an Android terminal emulator and Linux environment. What that means in practice is that you can install Termux on most Android devices and do almost anything you would do in a full Linux development environment on that device. That all sounds cool, but you're probably asking yourself, "why would I want to code on my phone on a touch screen? That just sounds awful." Start thinking more along the lines of tablets paired with a keyboards or Chromebooks that can now run Android applications. These are very cheap devices that can now be used to introduce people to Linux hacking and development. I know many of us in the Linux community started out by installing Linux on an old PC.

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More in Tux Machines

Qualcomm and Intel: a Linux Perspective

  • SBC showcases Qualcomm’s 10nm, octa-core QCS605 IoT SoC
    Intrinsyc’s compact “Open-Q 605” SBC for computer vision and edge AI applications runs Android 8.1 and Qualcomm’s Vision Intelligence Platform on Qualcomm’s IoT-focused, octa-core QCS605. In April, Qualcomm announced its QCS605 SoC, calling it “the first 10nm FinFET fabricated SoC purpose built for the Internet of Things.” The octa-core Arm SoC is available in an Intrinsyc Open-Q 605 SBC with full development kit with a 12V power supply is open for pre-orders at $429. The products will ship in early December.
  • Second-gen Intel Neural Compute Stick shows off new Myriad X VPU
    Intel has launched a $99 “Neural Compute Stick 2” AI accelerator built around a new Myriad X VPU that adds a Neural Compute Engine and more cores for up to 8x greater performance. Intel may be scaling back a bit on its IoT business, but it continues to push hard with the Myriad neural network acceleration technology it acquired when it bought Movidius. Intel has just released its third-gen “Myriad X” technology for AI acceleration on edge devices, debuting on a $99 Intel Neural Compute Stick 2 (NCS2).

Security: Credit Cards, Hollywood's Cracking Scenes, Understanding Kali Linux, and Adobe Flash Player Must Die

  • That Domain You Forgot to Renew? Yeah, it’s Now Stealing Credit Cards

    If you own a domain name that gets decent traffic and you fail to pay its annual renewal fee, chances are this mistake will be costly for you and for others. Lately, neglected domains have been getting scooped up by crooks who use them to set up fake e-commerce sites that steal credit card details from unwary shoppers.

    [...]

    If you’re on the fence about whether to renew a domain and it’s one of several you own, it may make sense to hold onto it and simply forward any incoming traffic to a domain you do want people to visit. In the event you decide to relinquish a domain, make sure you take stock of any online accounts you created with email addresses tied to that domain and move those to another email address, as those accounts will likely come under someone else’s control when the domain expires.

  • Stolen credit card details of nearly 250,000 British Airways customers on sale for up to £9.4m
  • Watch a real hacker hack into Hollywood's hacky hacking scenes
    As with bad sex, most bad hacking scenes in movies and television involve someone needing to announce, “I’m in!” Since not long after people started connecting computers to other computers, Hollywood has been depicting fictional people attempting to use those connections for nefarious means. Naturally, Hollywood has also spent a lot of its time getting those depictions wrong. In the above clip from Wired, security researcher Samy Kamkar assesses a number of famous hacking scenes from TV and film to see just how off they are.
  • Red Team 101: Understanding Kali Linux
    Your security environment is complicated. You’re invested in multiple security tools – antivirus, firewalls, IDS, IPS, SIEM, DLP, and more. If you haven’t invested in a red team, however, you’re doing security wrong. How could you know that your expensive defenses are working unless you’ve tested them out? A red team is a great way to test your defenses. In brief, a red team is a small group of employees whose job is to try to hack into your organization, understand its vulnerabilities, and then help you patch them up.
  • Adobe Flash Player Update Version 31.0.0.148 Addresses a Significant Vulnerability Issue

A Linux Noob Reviews: The Pop!_OS Installer From System76

Welcome to a new series here at Forbes that zeroes in on your very first experience with a new desktop Linux operating system: the installer. In this debut review I'm going to explain why the heck I'm doing this, and give you a closer look at the relatively new Pop!_OS installer from boutique PC manufacturer System76 -- the same installer that actually inspired these articles. (Spoiler: yes it's that good.) [...] That tagline, present in the default wallpaper for Pop!_OS, also says a little something about the installer itself. This is, in my experience, sets a benchmark for other installers in the desktop Linux world. Even the most complex aspect of installing a Linux OS -- partitioning -- is explained in detail. Granted, the simplest partitioning tasks will take rookies a few tries to comprehend and master (myself included), but System76 did an exemplary job with the included help pages, and the interface is the most intuitive I've used. So far anyway! Seriously folks, I never thought I'd walk away from an installer and feel excited. Nor did I imagine it would inspire an entire series of articles. But here we are! System76 has crafted an intuitive, fast and streamlined installation process that improves the incoming perception of desktop Linux for newcomers, and may perhaps feel like a breath of fresh air for Linux veterans. Overall, it looks fantastic and made me eager to dig into the daily Pop!_OS experience. Read more

LF Deep Learning Delivers First Acumos AI Release Making it Easier to Deploy and Share Artificial Intelligence Models

  • LF Deep Learning Delivers First Acumos AI Release Making it Easier to Deploy and Share Artificial Intelligence Models
    The LF Deep Learning Foundation, a project of The Linux Foundation that supports open source innovation in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and deep learning (DL), today announced the availability of its first software release of the Acumos AI Project – Athena. Acumos AI is a platform and open source framework that makes it easy to build, share and deploy AI applications. Acumos AI standardizes the infrastructure stack and components required to run an out-of-the-box general AI environment. This frees data scientists and model trainers to focus on their core competencies and accelerate innovation.
  • Linux Foundation's Acumos Wants To Make It Easier Deploying AI Apps
    The latest software initiative out of the Linux Foundation -- and in particular their Deep Learning Foundation -- is the Acumos AI "Athena" release that tries to make it easier dealing with artificial intelligence apps. Acumos Athena is an effort to make it easier to deploy AI applications across private/public clouds and other environments. Acumos is a framework for building, sharing, and deploying AI applications and provides a standardized stack for these components.