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Linux Foundation and ONF on Free Software in Networking

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OSS
  • The edge defines experience, but can’t be done without open source – ONF

    For years the industry has been focusing on the core network, but the tides are beginning to turn, with the edge taking centre stage. While this is a promising development, the economics are simply not supporting the ambition.

    “Edge processing is vital,” said Timon Sloane, VP of Marketing & Ecosystem at ONF. “When we started talking about this it was a novel idea, but the industry is just catching on now. The subscriber edge is where experience is created.”

    This focus on the edge of the network is a huge opportunity, but also presents a massive problem. The core network is easy. It is one place, easy to manage, but the edge consists of thousands of sites which are usually located within three miles of the customer. Most of the time these sites are windowless, concrete bunkers, with little or no lighting, representing 80% of operator CAPEX. Upgrading these sites is critical to the performance of the network, but is a time consuming and expensive job.

  • The First 10 Years of Software Defined Networking

    In 2008, if you wanted to build a network, you had to build it from the same switch and router equipment that everyone else had, according to Nick McKeown, co-founder of Barefoot Networks, speaking as part of a panel of networking experts at Open Networking Summit North America.

    Equipment was closed, proprietary, and vertically integrated with features already baked in, McKeown noted. And, “network management was a dirty word. If you wanted to manage a network of switches, you had to write your own scripts over a lousy, cruddy CLI, and everybody had their own way of doing it in order to try to make their network different from everybody else’s.”

More on Linux Foundation and ONF

  • ONF: Major Vendors Not Joining Open Edge

    The major incumbent telecom vendors have not embraced the Open Networking Foundation's new initiative to build the supply chain and ecosystem to enable rapid deployment of edge computing, an ONF executive said here today. As a result, that effort is moving forward with other vendors.

    Speaking at the Open Compute Project workshop in advance of BCE, Timon Sloane, vice-president of marketing and ecosystem, admitted that those "major incumbents" -- whom he didn't specifically name -- were part of a December Open Networking Foundation meeting at which the strategy was adopted that involved operator-driven reference designs that would push open source edge platform deployments forward faster. (See ONF Operators Take Charge of Edge SDN.)

    "If you had looked at our partner list a few months ago, you would have seen all major incumbents on our partner list," Sloane commented in response to an audience question. "Those incumbents have not stepped up, they have not shown us they are making that level of investment. So we have made a shift."

  • Lisbeth McNabb Joins the Linux Foundation as Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer

    The Linux Foundation, the organization of choice for the world's top developers and companies to build and advance open technology, today announced Lisbeth McNabb is joining the organization as Chief Financial Officer (CFO) and Chief Operating Officer (COO).

    McNabb brings extensive finance and operations experience to The Linux Foundation, having lead teams at large organizations such as Match.com and PepsiCo. McNabb will manage the finance and operations teams at The Linux Foundation.

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