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End of Red Hat Summit 2018: Coverage

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Summit 2018 Wraps Up With Containers/Virtualization Still Being Hot

    Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco has now wrapped up, marking Red Hat's 25th year hosting the event of customers and partners. Virtualization and containers continued being among the most discussed topics at the tech event.

    While there's been signs of an approaching Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Alpha, sadly there was seemingly no RHEL8 mentions at this year's summit, at least when it came to public announcements pertaining to this next-generation enterprise Linux platform. So we'll have to wait and see on the RHEL8 front, but based upon their past release cycles and the alpha references we've been seeing, I suspect we'll hear more later in the year.

  • Red Hat, Boston Children’s Collaborate on Open Source Image Sharing

    Red Hat announced its collaboration with Boston Children’s Hospital to provide a distributed user open source image sharing interface so clinicians and radiologists can share images in real-time anywhere around the world.

    The ChRIS Research Integration Service is a web-based medical image platform deployed on the Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC). The MOC is a multi-provider cloud that was created by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and several research universities.

    The collaboration was put into motion by the need for faster and more convenient access to medical images. Waiting for images to be scanned, shared, and analyzed causes delays in patient care, which can cause further medical problems.

  • Photos: Red Hat Gets Hot & Sweaty

    Tech conference protip: When attending conferences, my rule is I wear jeans to events with the name "open" in the title, and otherwise wear a suit. Red Hat is a unique edge case -- the word "open" isn't in the title, but the company is founded on open source. On the other hand, it's enterprise focused, suggesting a suit as appropriate business attire. I went with a suit on day one, and jeans on day two.

    When I was not running around working on articles, and feeling the pain of sugar/carb withdrawal, I found some interesting oddities in corners of the conference. Click on the slideshow below for some of what I saw.

  • Red Hat shows the way for open-source licensing. Will the industry follow?

    The licensing of open-source software is complicated and runs counter to human intuition. Developers put their blood, sweat and tears into creating an elegant piece of software and then sign away the copyrights so that others can use and improve on it free and clear. Say what?

    The tech community has been grappling with this issue basically since Richard Stallman developed a free UNIX-style operating system in the early 1980s. As the open-source community has grown, the products have become more diverse and the stakes are higher.

    [...]

    At the heart of open-source licensing is the General Public License, or GPL, the compliance instrument that governs much of Red Hat’s software, including its Enterprise Linux. The GPL is known as a “copyleft” license, meaning that a developer can create open-source software and distribute it to someone else with all of the necessary copyrights. The recipient can copy it, distribute it, or improve on it in any way they see fit.

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