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Thieves steal thousands from Portland non-profit

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Thieves broke into a non-profit that builds computers for people who can't afford them, stealing about $4,500 worth of hardware early Saturday.

Volunteers said it was a big setback for the group, which calls itself Free Geek, as well as the schools and community organizations they serve.

The thieves made off with laptops, laptop RAM, LCD screens and high-end Apple computers and damaged a number of doors at the organization's southeast Portland workshop

"Keep an eye out for laptops for sale in Portland loaded with Ubuntu Linux: if you see one of these, please call us! " the organization said on its Web site.

Full Story w/ Video available.

Oh, fer heavens sake!

I used to volunteer for these folks, and they're very dedicated to what they do. They "recycle" unwanted computers and give them away. They also dismantle old unusable computer equipment and keep toxic computer junk out of landfills. Sorry to hear about this stupid crime.
--
><)))°> Kanotix: Making Linux work. http://kanotix.com

Hope you get the stuff back

It's a sad sad world. Hope you guys catch these slimeballs and get the equipment back.
KP

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