Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Getting Started:

First Impressions:

My first attempt at booting into this live CD edition of Ubuntu ended in a hung machine. This was disappointing. However, when I tried again with the safe video mode it booted perfectly. Since this probably had more to do with my old twitchy test hardware than the distro I give them a pass on this one.

On with the install:

Upon booting up I was taken to a nice looking albeit brownish (not a big fan of brown) desktop. The desktop contained a single icon named Install. So a gave it a click.

Full Story.

re: Ubuntu Christian Edition

Yawn.

Write when your god (or any god for that matter) actually shows up and helps with the install (or better yet, with the coding).

Until then, leave the Ubuntu coverage to the other type of fanatics (you know, the Ubuntu freaks - at least they're more believable).

You can thank God for...

You can thank God for allowing you to draw the breath that let you yawn at this review. For creating you in such a way that you are capable of communicating with others and understanding when they attempt to communicate with you, as in this review. For giving you the freedom to choose not to believe in Him.

How about inspiration? After all, isn't the computer a cheap imitation of the human brain? What you have there under your skull is a parallel processor of unfathomable proportions, running an operating system that performs hundreds of tasks simultaneously. Under the category of automated daemons, your mind automatically monitors and regulates temperature, repairs its chassis, maintains necessary chemical stability, cleans and lubricates your optic sensors, and provides an interface to exotic hardware that we have, for the most part, been unable to replicate or even simulate.

Do you believe that this complicated, beautiful mesh of machinery and code happened by chance? If I tried to argue that Linux came about when Linus Torvalds took a microcomputer and locked it in a garage for two months, I'd be laughed off the street. If I argued that Linux came about when some ancient mathematician buried an abacus behind a rock 4400 years ago, I'd get a similar reaction. If I tried to argue that the code for Linux developed from some marks on a rock 3 billion years ago, nobody would believe me. Just by looking at the code for Linux, and the way it lets us interact with hardware, we have to, as thinking beings, conclude that somebody designed Linux. Moreover, we know who did... Linus Torvalds. We've read the stories. Some people have received emails from him. Others have met him face-to-face. I've never met Linus, never gotten an email from him, never seen his picture online... but I believe he exists. I've had a lot more contact with God, and seen a lot more evidence for Him than I have for Linus Torvalds...

But I suppose none of this impresses you. After all, the only group of people it's politically correct to pick on and hate anymore is Christians. Think about that the next time somebody ridicules YOU.

re: you can

Spinlock wrote:
After all, the only group of people it's politically correct to pick on and hate anymore is Christians.

Grow up.

I think anyone over the age of 5 that believes in a Santa Claus figure is stupid beyond compare.

I don't care what flavor of religion you delude yourself with - they're all one big fairy tale used to herd the sheep of their communities into supporting the charlatans that lead their sham organizations.

It never ceases to amaze me how many people lack the brainpower to determine fact from fiction.

Lack of brainpower, eh?

Santa Claus figure? You apparently have no idea. No idea whatsoever.

So what you're suggesting is that anyone who believes in God is an idiot? Okay. Here's a (small) list of people you've got to answer for:

Isaac Newton
Robert Boyle
Albert Einstein
Michael Faraday
Lord Kelvin
Robert Dalton
Louis Pasteur
Johann Kepler
William Herschel
Galileo Galilei
Blaise Pascal
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz
Carolus Linnaeus
Jean Deluc
Georges Cuvier
James Joule
Rudolph Virchow
Gregor Mendel
Joseph Lister
Bernhard Reimann
James Clerk Maxwell
P.G. Tait
John Ambrose Fleming
George Washington Carver
Dr. John Baumgardner

Note that several of the above made contributions to science or mathematics which lead to the foundation of computer science.

You were saying?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Python, Vim, Go and More

  • How to integrate jenkins with webhook
  • Serving Gifs With Discord Bot - Reading Time: 12 Mins
  • Python Snippet 1: More Uses For Else
  • Python Celery Guide
  • Python String Find()
  • PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2

    It hasn’t been long since we published PyCharm 2019.2 Beta, and now we’re ready to share with you the second Beta build! The final release date is getting closer and closer, and while you wait, give PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2 a go! Get the PyCharm 2019.2 Beta build from our website and try all the latest functionality.

  • Vimrc Tutorial

    In this article, we’re going to dive deep into the vimrc file of Vim. Once you’re inside the vimscript, it’s easy to mess things up. That’s why this rule of thumb will always be helpful in your journey with Vim. Don’t put any line in vimrc that you don’t understand.

  • CPU atomics and orderings explained

    Sometimes the question comes up about how CPU memory orderings work, and what they do. I hope this post explains it in a really accessible way.

  • You can't say Go without Google – specifically, our little logo, Chocolate Factory insists

    Back in 2009, Google chose to name its latest programming language Go, a decision that is still giving it a migraine It could have called it "Google Go" to avoid confusion with Frank McCabe's Go! programming language. Despite criticism, it didn't do so. After almost a year of online grumbling, Google software engineer Russ Cox, in 2010, closed GitHub Issue #9, dismissing the complaints as "unfortunate." And the headaches over the thing's name still won't go away (no pun intended.) Last week, Google rebuffed a request to remove its logo from the Go website, golang.org, a change supported by some developers who feel Google takes Go developers for granted.

Games: Kubernetes Within the Context of Video Games, Please, RetroArch

  • Kubernetes: The Video Game

    Grant Shipley was recently in China for KubeCon, where he gave a keynote talk explaining the Kubernetes ecosystem within the context of Video Games. It’s a fun way to examine the entire world of Kubernetes, from end to end, while also enabling Grant to make Mavis Beacon and Commodore 64 references. Take a gander!

  • Please, a tense ten-minute experience has a Linux build available

    Got a few minutes to burn? Why not try out the short experimental experience that Please offers. Developed by somewhat, it delivers something quite surreal and freaky.

  • Achievement Unlocked: RetroArch is Coming to Steam

    Fans of retro (and not so retro) gaming will be pleased to hear that RetroArch is coming to Steam. Not familiar with RetroArch? It’s a user-friendly GUI that makes use of the libretro API. That API allows developers to create, among other things, modular ‘libretro’ cores that act as game emulators for systems like the SNES, Mega Drive and Game Boy. The famed front-end for the popular Libretro API will be available to install on Steam for Windows from July 30. Linux and macOS versions will follow. The libretro cores that power RetroArch can be used with other compatible frontends (like GNOME Games app) but RetroArch is arguably the best one.

IBM, Red Hat and Fedora

  • IBM Takes A Hands Off Approach With Red Hat

    IBM has been around long enough in the IT racket that it doesn’t have any trouble maintaining distinct portfolios of products that have overlapping and often incompatible functions. The System/3, which debuted in 1969, is only five years older than the System/360, which laid the foundation and set the pace for corporate computing when it launched in 1964. Both styles of machines continue to exist today as the IBM i on Power Systems platform and the System z. With the $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat, which closed last week, neither of those two legacy products are under threat and IBM does not seem to be inclined whatsoever in ceasing development of the legacy operating system and middleware stacks embodied in the IBM i and System z lines. As Arvind Krishna, senior vice president in charge of IBM’s cloud and cognitive software products, put it bluntly in a call after the deal closed, IBM’s customers expect for Big Blue to maintain its own operating systems, middleware, storage, databases, and security software in the IBM i, AIX, and System z lines, and that is precisely what Big Blue is going to do. Krisha estimated that there is only about 5 percent overlap in products between Big Blue and Red Hat – something we talked about at length when the deal was announced last October – and added that in many enterprise accounts that use both Red Hat and IBM platforms, companies invest in both sets of software for different purposes – perhaps using JBoss in one case and WebSphere in another, for instance.

  • Tech cos go for Edtech tie-ups to get that ready workforce

    Companies like Wipro, Accenture, IBM and others are tying up with edtech partners like upGrad, Simplilearn and Udacity to have a ready-trained workforce they can deploy on projects. Additional benefits include minimal training cost incurred post recruitment and a lesser churn as learners develop more ownership in their roles. The edtech firms provide campus recruits the required platform, content, assignments and project work in their last semester of college to ensure they are prepared with programming skills and emerging digital skills before they join.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 improves performance for modern workloads

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 can provide significant performance improvements over RHEL 7 across a range of modern workloads. To put this in context, we used RHEL 7.6 to execute multiple benchmarks with Intel's 2nd generation of Intel Xeon Scalable processors, and our hardware partners set 35 new world record performance results using the same OS version. This post will highlight RHEL 8 performance gains over RHEL 7. How did we get here? The performance engineering team at Red Hat collaborates with software partners and hardware OEMs to measure and optimize performance across workloads that range from high-end databases, NoSQL databases packaged in RHEL, Java applications, and third party databases and applications from Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, SAS, and SAP HANA ERP applications. We run multiple benchmarks and measure the performance of CPU, memory, disk I/O and networking. Testing includes the filesystems we ship with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, such as XFS, Ext4, GFS2, Gluster and Ceph.

  • Federation V2 is now KubeFed

    Some time ago we talked about how Federation V2 on Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 enables users to spread their applications and services across multiple locales or clusters. As a fast moving project, lots of changes happened since our last blog post. Among those changes, Federation V2 has been renamed to KubeFed and we have released OpenShift 4. In today’s blog post we are going to look at KubeFed from an OpenShift 4 perspective, as well as show you a stateful demo application deployed across multiple clusters connected with KubeFed. There are still some unknowns around KubeFed; specifically in storage and networking. We are evaluating different solutions because we want to we deliver a top-notch product to manage your clusters across multiple regions/clouds in a clear and user-friendly way. Stay tuned for more information to come!

  • Duplicity 0.8.01

    Duplicity 0.8.01 is now in rawhide. The big change here is that it now uses Python 3. I’ve tested it in my own environment, both on it’s own and with deja-dup, and both work. Please test and file bugs. I expect there will be more, but with Python 2 reaching EOL soon, it’s important to move everything we can to Python 3.

Security: FOSS Updates, WhatsApp and Telegram, Windows as Malware and Respect to Fernando Corbató

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox), Debian (libspring-java, ruby-mini-magick, and thunderbird), Fedora (fossil, python-django, snapd-glib, and thunderbird), openSUSE (helm and monitoring-plugins), Red Hat (cyrus-imapd, thunderbird, and vim), Scientific Linux (vim), Slackware (bzip2), SUSE (bubblewrap, bzip2, expat, glib2, kernel, php7, python3, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (exiv2, firefox, and flightcrew).

  • WhatsApp, Telegram Vulnerable To ‘Media File Jacking’: Change Your Settings Now!

    Instant messaging apps like WhatsApp and Telegram keep your messages encrypted in transit, but once a media file reaches your phone, the same cannot be guaranteed. Researchers from Symantec have demonstrated how a vulnerability in WhatsApp and Telegram can be exploited by hackers to hijack the media files that are sent through these services.

  • Windows 7 & security-only telemetry - What gives?

    Sometimes, it is hard to separate fact from emotion when it comes to technology. This does not help the end user, because when people come searching for solutions to genuine concerns like this, they first have to filter through outbursts of pent-up frustration as a result of many years of salesy bullshit. From the technological point of view, there's nothing new here. However, the fact you now get non-security nonsense with security means you can't really trust updates from Microsoft anymore. So if anything, this will majestically backfire. People don't like being pushed, and I'm amazed with the repeated attempts to do so, again and again.

  • Fernando Corbató, Early Operating System Pioneer And Password Inventor, Dies At 93

    Corbató and his fellow researchers at MIT made possible much of what we now think of as computing.

  • Professor Emeritus Fernando Corbató, MIT computing pioneer, dies at 93

    Longtime MIT professor developed early “time-sharing” operating systems and is widely credited as the creator of the world's first computer password.