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Arch Linux 0.7.2 (Gimmick) Review

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Arch Linux is an i686-optimized distribution that has been compared to Slackware for its stability (and it's use of BSD-style init scripts) and has also been compared to Gentoo in terms of speed. Arch Linux was created by Judd Vinet and is actually a Linux From Scratch (LFS) project. Arch uses pacman as its installation/upgrade tool and is similar in function to Debian's apt-get.

Arch is available via download in the form of a full image (32-bit and 64-bit), a base image (32-bit and 64-bit) or an FTP image (32-bit and 64-bit). You can also purchase a CD directly from Arch Linux itself to help support the project, which is always a noble cause and one we recommend. This is another area where Arch is similar to Gentoo. Whether you download the newest available .iso image or a slightly older image, after a pacman -Syu (syncs with repositories listed in /etc/pacman.conf and updates any older packages) you're up to date, or current.

I have just recently installed Gimmick (0.7.2) to both Vmware Workstation and to a hard drive (80 GB/IDE) of a desktop computer. The installation process is similar to Slackware's in that it is text-based.

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