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Microsoft Linux, Linux 4.17, and Linux 5.0

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Linux
  • Microsoft built its own custom Linux kernel for its new IoT service [Ed: After Microsoft repeatedly violated the GPL and while Microsoft is blackmailing companies for using Linux. The 'new Microsoft': we exploit you while we attack you while lying about it and paying those who would otherwise complain about it.]

    At a small press event in San Francisco, Microsoft today announced the launch of a secure end-to-end IoT product that focuses on microcontroller-based devices — the kind of devices that use tiny and relatively low-powered microcontrollers (MCUs) for basic control or connectivity features. Typically, these kinds of devices, which could be anything from a toy to a household gadget or an industrial application, don’t often get updated and hence, security often suffers.

  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Linux 4.17 Development, Teases the Linux 5.0 Release

    Two weeks after the launch of Linux kernel 4.16, Linus Torvalds kicked off the development cycle of the Linux 4.17 kernel series by releasing the first Release Candidate (RC) build.

    At the end of every Linux kernel development cycle, the merge window opens for the next release, in this case, Linux 4.17. Now, two weeks later, the merge window is closed, and public testers can start downloading, compiling, and installing the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Linus Torvalds says Linux kernel v5.0 'should be meaningless'

    Following the release of Linux kernel 4.16, Linus Torvalds has said that the next kernel will be version 5.0. Or maybe it won't, because version numbers are meaningless.

    The announcement -- of sorts -- came in Torvalds' message over the weekend about the first release candidate for version 4.17. He warns that it is not "shaping up to be a particularly big release" and questions whether it even matters what version number is slapped on the final release.

More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 4.17.7, 4.14.56, 4.9.113 and 4.4.141

Open-spec NAS SBC with 4x SATA 3.0 ports relaunches

Kobol has relaunched its open-spec “Helios4” NAS SBC and fanned system. The Helios4 runs Debian on a Marvell Armada 388 SoC with 2GB ECC RAM and offers 1x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, and 4x SATA 3.0 ports for up to 48TB. In May 2017, Singapore-based startup Kobol attempted to launch its open-spec Helios4 SBC and fan-equipped system for network attached storage (NAS) on Kickstarter. A total of 337 backers ponied up $74K for the Helios4, which also supports media streaming and file sharing. Kobol fell short of its $110K funding goal, but it fulfilled the last of its KS orders in January. The company is now running its own funding campaign to manufacture a second 500-unit batch. Read more

Security Leftovers

Cutelyst 2.5.0 released

Cutelyst a C++ web framework based on Qt got a new release. This release has some important bug fixes so it’s really recommended to upgrade to it. Most of this release fixes came form a side project I started called Cloudlyst, I did some work for the NextCloud client, and due that I became interested into how WebDAV protocol works, so Cloudlyst is a server implementation of WebDAV, it also passes all litmus tests. WebDAV protocol makes heavy use of REST concept, and although it uses XML instead of JSON it’s actually a good choice since XML can be parsed progressively which is important for large directories. Read more