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Clonezilla Live Disk Cloning OS Gets New Massive Deployment BitTorrent Mechanism

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GNU
Linux

The open source and freely distributed Clonezilla Live disk cloning and imaging live system recently received a new stable release that adds several new features, enhancements, and other changes.

Clonezilla Live 2.5.5-38 is now the latest stable release of the live system based on the open-source partition and disk imaging and cloning Clonezilla software. It's synced with the software repositories of the Debian Sid operating system series and uses a recent kernel from the Linux 4.15 branch.

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