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today's leftovers

  • Civil Infrastructure Platform Takes Open Source to an Industrial Scale

    One of the less discussed uses for open source software is actually in the role that it plays for industrial-scale hardware. Whereas power plants, factories, and other large infrastructure projects were once ruled over nearly entirely by operational technology (OT) control systems, in recent years, information technology — built on open source software — has been making its way onto the scene in an increasingly significant way.

    Additionally, another surprising fact is that the this push to use open source in complex hardware operations has been embraced by industry leaders. One company helping to lead the charge is Siemens, one of the world’s largest producers of hardware devices, Siemens. Siemens plays an active role in advancing open source in the industrial space, with a focus on making open source security a priority for development, in part through their involvement in the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) initiative.

  • Final Directive is a surprisingly good shooter, we have a copy to give away

    Final Directive is a pretty good shooter that released for Linux back in February and we have a copy to give away.

  • The Vrms Program Helps You To Find Non-free Software In Debian
  • ‘Dead Cells’ Was Supposed to Be in a Different Genre

    And we’re going to release the Mac and Linux versions as soon as we can.

  • [Krita] Interview with Runend

    I have tried some of the features, especially the brush engine, UI/UX, layering, animation tools, I love all of them! And of course it’s free and open source.

  • Kdenlive in Paris

    The next weeks will be exciting for Kdenlive! First, there is a Kdenlive sprint, that will take place in Paris from the 25th to the 29th of april. We are very proud to be hosted at the Carrefour Numérique in the Cité des Sciences, Paris.

  • Free software log (March 2018)

    I did get a few software releases out this month, although not as much as I'd planned and I still have a lot of new releases pending that are waiting for me to have a bit more free time.

    control-archive got a 1.8.0 release, which catches up from accumulated changes over the past year plus and falls back to GnuPG v1 for signature processing. One of the projects that I'd like to find time for is redoing all of my scattered code for making and checking Usenet control messages.

  • Update desktop components for released version
  • Building my ideal router for $50

    After my Asus N66U kicked the bucket, I considered a few options: another all-in-one router, upgrade to something like an EdgeRouter, or brew something custom. When I read the Ars Technica article espousing the virtues of building your own router, that pretty much settled it: DIY it is.

    I’ve got somewhat of a psychological complex when it comes to rolling my own over-engineered solutions, but I did set some general goals: the end result should be cheap, low-power, well-supported by Linux, and extensible. Incidentally, ARM boards fit many of these requirements, and some like the Raspberry Pi have stirred up so much community activity that there’s great support for the ARM platform, even though it may feel foreign from x86.

    I’ve managed to cobble together a device that is not only dirt cheap for what it does, but is extremely capable in its own right. If you have any interest in building your own home router, I’ll demonstrate here that doing so is not only feasible, but relatively easy to do and offers a huge amount of utility - from traffic shaping, to netflow monitoring, to dynamic DNS.

    I built it using the espressobin, Arch Linux Arm, and Shorewall.

More in Tux Machines

The "Chinese EPYC" Hygon Dhyana CPU Support Still Getting Squared Away For Linux

Back in June is when the Linux kernel patches appeared for the Hygon Dhyana, the new x86 processors based on AMD Zen/EPYC technology licensed by Chengdu Haiguang IC Design Co for use in Chinese data-centers. While the patches have been out for months, they haven't reached the mainline kernel quite yet but that might change next cycle. The Hygon Dyhana Linux kernel patches have gone through several revisions and the code is mostly adapting existing AMD Linux kernel code paths for Zen/EPYC to do the same on these new processors. While these initial Hygon CPUs appear to basically be re-branded EPYC CPUs, the identifiers are different as rather than AMD Family 17h, it's now Family 18h and the CPU Vendor ID is "HygonGenuine" and carries a new PCI Express device vendor ID, etc. So the different areas of the kernel from CPUFreq to KVM/Xen virtualization to Spectre V2 mitigations had to be updated for the correct behavior. Read more

Good Support For Wayland Remote Desktop Handling On Track For KDE Plasma 5.15

The KDE Plasma 5.15 release due out next year will likely be in good shape for Wayland remote desktop handling. The KDE Plasma/KWin developers have been pursuing Wayland remote desktop support along a similar route to the GNOME Shell camp by making use of PipeWire and the XDG-Desktop-Portal. Bits are already in place for KDE Plasma 5.13 and the upcoming 5.14 release, but for the 5.15 release is now where it sounds like the support may be in good shape for end-users. Read more

Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch”

Linux powers the internet, the Android in your pocket, and perhaps even some of your household appliances. A controversy over politics is now seeing some of its developers threatening to withdraw the license to all of their code, potentially destroying or making the whole Linux kernel unusable for a very long time. Read more

Games: SC Controller, PlayOnLinux, OpenRA, Galaxy in Turmoil