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today's leftovers

  • Civil Infrastructure Platform Takes Open Source to an Industrial Scale

    One of the less discussed uses for open source software is actually in the role that it plays for industrial-scale hardware. Whereas power plants, factories, and other large infrastructure projects were once ruled over nearly entirely by operational technology (OT) control systems, in recent years, information technology — built on open source software — has been making its way onto the scene in an increasingly significant way.

    Additionally, another surprising fact is that the this push to use open source in complex hardware operations has been embraced by industry leaders. One company helping to lead the charge is Siemens, one of the world’s largest producers of hardware devices, Siemens. Siemens plays an active role in advancing open source in the industrial space, with a focus on making open source security a priority for development, in part through their involvement in the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) initiative.

  • Final Directive is a surprisingly good shooter, we have a copy to give away

    Final Directive is a pretty good shooter that released for Linux back in February and we have a copy to give away.

  • The Vrms Program Helps You To Find Non-free Software In Debian
  • ‘Dead Cells’ Was Supposed to Be in a Different Genre

    And we’re going to release the Mac and Linux versions as soon as we can.

  • [Krita] Interview with Runend

    I have tried some of the features, especially the brush engine, UI/UX, layering, animation tools, I love all of them! And of course it’s free and open source.

  • Kdenlive in Paris

    The next weeks will be exciting for Kdenlive! First, there is a Kdenlive sprint, that will take place in Paris from the 25th to the 29th of april. We are very proud to be hosted at the Carrefour Numérique in the Cité des Sciences, Paris.

  • Free software log (March 2018)

    I did get a few software releases out this month, although not as much as I'd planned and I still have a lot of new releases pending that are waiting for me to have a bit more free time.

    control-archive got a 1.8.0 release, which catches up from accumulated changes over the past year plus and falls back to GnuPG v1 for signature processing. One of the projects that I'd like to find time for is redoing all of my scattered code for making and checking Usenet control messages.

  • Update desktop components for released version
  • Building my ideal router for $50

    After my Asus N66U kicked the bucket, I considered a few options: another all-in-one router, upgrade to something like an EdgeRouter, or brew something custom. When I read the Ars Technica article espousing the virtues of building your own router, that pretty much settled it: DIY it is.

    I’ve got somewhat of a psychological complex when it comes to rolling my own over-engineered solutions, but I did set some general goals: the end result should be cheap, low-power, well-supported by Linux, and extensible. Incidentally, ARM boards fit many of these requirements, and some like the Raspberry Pi have stirred up so much community activity that there’s great support for the ARM platform, even though it may feel foreign from x86.

    I’ve managed to cobble together a device that is not only dirt cheap for what it does, but is extremely capable in its own right. If you have any interest in building your own home router, I’ll demonstrate here that doing so is not only feasible, but relatively easy to do and offers a huge amount of utility - from traffic shaping, to netflow monitoring, to dynamic DNS.

    I built it using the espressobin, Arch Linux Arm, and Shorewall.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust and WebAssembly, WebRender, MDN Changelog for November 2018, Things Gateway and Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday

  • Rust and WebAssembly in 2019
    Compiling Rust to WebAssembly should be the best choice for fast, reliable code for the Web. Additionally, the same way that Rust integrates with C calling conventions and libraries on native targets, Rust should also integrate with JavaScript and HTML5 on the Web. These are the Rust and WebAssembly domain working group’s core values. In 2018, we made it possible to surgically replace performance-sensitive JavaScript with Rust-generated WebAssembly.
  • rust for cortex-m7 baremetal
  • WebRender newsletter #33
    Yes indeed. In order for picture caching to work across displaylists we must be able to detect what did not change after a new displaylist arrives. The interning mechanism introduced by Glenn in #3075 gives us this ability in addition to other goodies such as de-duplication of interned resources and less CPU-GPU data transfer.
  • MDN Changelog for November 2018
    Potato London started work on this shortly after one-time payments launched. We kicked it off with a design meeting where we determined the features that could be delivered in 4 weeks. Potato and MDN worked closely to remove blockers, review code (in over 25 pull requests), and get it into the staging environment for testing. Thanks to everyone’s hard work, we launched a high-quality feature on schedule. We’ve learned a lot from these payment experiments, and we’ll continue to find ways to maintain MDN’s growth in 2019.
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
    Today, I'm going to talk about creating a Virtual Weather Station using the Things Gateway from Mozilla and a developer account from Weather Underground. The two combined enable home automation control from weather events like temperature, wind, and precipitation.
  • Taskgraph Like a Pro
    Have you ever needed to inspect the taskgraph locally? Did you have a bad time? Learn how to inspect the taskgraph like a PRO. For the impatient skip to the installation instructions below.
  • Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday, December 21th
    We are happy to let you know that Friday, December 21th, we are organizing Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: and changes and UpdateDirectory. Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

Fedora Developers Are Trying To Figure Out The Best Linux I/O Scheduler, Fedora 29 Review and Fedora Program Management

ARM's Work in Linux (Kernel)

  • Energy Model Management Framework Queued For Linux 4.21
    A new framework queued for introduction with the Linux 4.21 kernel is the ARM-developed Energy Model Management Framework. With different hardware and drivers exposing the processor/system energy consumption in different manners, the Energy Model Management Framework tries to provide a standardized way of accessing the power values for each performance domain in a system. This can help kernel drivers/schedulers and other code that could make smarter decisions based upon current energy use be able to do so via this standardized framework for acquiring the power information on capable systems.
  • ARM's AArch64 Adding Pointer Authentication Support To The Linux 4.21 Kernel
    The 64-bit ARM architecture code (a.k.a ARM64 / AArch64) with the Linux 4.21 kernel is seeing pointer authentication added as a new security feature. Pointer authentication can be supported by ARMv8.3 hardware and newer to allow for signing and authenticating of pointers against secret keys. The purpose of this pointer authentication is to mitigate ROP attacks and other potential buffer-overrun-style attacks. This ARM64_PTR_AUTH functionality will enable pointer authentication for all user-space processes and the presence of supported hardware is determined at run-time. ARM developers have been working on the plumbing for this Linux kernel support for it the past year.

The OSD and user freedom

The relationship between open source and free software is fraught with people arguing about meanings and value. In spite of all the things we’ve built up around open source and free software, they reduce down to both being about software freedom. Open source is about software freedom. It has been the case since “open source” was created. In 1986 the Four Freedoms of Free Software (4Fs) were written. In 1998 Netscape set its source code free. Later that year a group of people got together and Christine Peterson suggested that, to avoid ambiguity, there was a “need for a better name” than free software. She suggested open source after open source intelligence. The name stuck and 20 years later we argue about whether software freedom matters to open source, because too many global users of the term have forgotten (or never knew) that some people just wanted another way to say software that ensures the 4Fs. Once there was a term, the term needed a formal definition: how to we describe what open source is? That’s where the Open Source Definition (OSD) comes in. The OSD is a set of ten points that describe what an open source license looks like. The OSD came from the Debian Free Software Guidelines. The DFSG themselves were created to “determine if a work is free” and ought to be considered a way of describing the 4Fs. Read more