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For project safety backup your people, not just your data

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OSS

The FSF was founded in 1985, Perl in 1987 (happy 30th birthday, Perl!), and Linux in 1991. The term open source and the Open Source Initiative both came into being in 1998 (and turn 20 years old in 2018). Since then, free and open source software has grown to become the default choice for software development, enabling incredible innovation.

We, the greater open source community, have come of age. Millions of open source projects exist today, and each year the GitHub Octoverse reports millions of new public repositories. We rely on these projects every day, and many of us could not operate our services or our businesses without them.

So what happens when the leaders of these projects move on? How can we help ease those transitions while ensuring that the projects thrive? By teaching and encouraging succession planning.

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Also:

  • Dear software manager, working in the open for the very first time? Challenges (Sleepy

    When moving from managing software projects/teams in classic corporate environments into Open Source (FOSS) projects, there are several new challenges any front line manager will need to face.

  • Dear software manager, working in the open for the very first time? Face the challenges (II)

    Working in the open involve new challenges that requires a different mindset to be successfully faced by front line managers moving from corporate to Open Source projects. They will need to develop new habits and the most effective way to do so, in my view, is understanding since day one that your focus will need to move towards alignment instead of insisting in autonomy, according to my mental model. With that in mind, my advice is to pay special attention to those habits that will lead you to become a servant for your managees, promoting transparency by example…

  • More in Tux Machines

    Software: LibreOffice, X-Gimp, COPR and Tauon Music Box

    • [LibreOffice] menubar updates [updated]
    • X-Gimp 2.10.10 [rev25]
      Image editors are ten-a-penny nowadays, so anything which wants attention from a divided audience needs to offer something quite special. X-Gimp is the portable version of GIMP (or the GNU Image Manipulation Program), which is one of the most powerful free image editors available and is frequently described as being a free alternative to the likes of Photoshop. This is a highly versatile tool which can be used as a basic drawing program but can also be employed to edit digital photographs to a professional level. Despite being free of charge, opting to use GIMP does not mean having to compromise on features. Layers, masks, channels, filters and special effects, in addition to the usual range of editing tools, are all on hand to make image editing as easy as possible. Powerful tools such as the correction mode which allows for the correction of barrel distortion and perspective problems are usually only found in expensive packages but are included here for anyone to try out. Whether you are an amateur digital photographer or a professional graphic artist, GIMP has something to offer you.
    • Fedora Magazine: 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April 2019
      COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software. Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.
    • Tauon Music Box – Excellent desktop music player
      Over the past few months I’ve covered scores of open source graphical music players. They’ve been a mixed bag. Some are genuinely excellent, others falling short of my (fairly) modest requirements. The music players I’ve mostly reviewed include ncmpy, ncmpc, and Cantata. I’ve also reviewed Nulloy, Museeks, Pragha Music Player, Yarock, qoob, aux.app, MellowPlayer, Kaku, Strawberry, Headset, Qmmp, and the truly sublime musikcube. The vast majority of the music players are GUI software. Continuing my series, here’s a further graphical music player. Bearing the moniker Tauon Music Box (Tauon), it’s based around disposable playlists and the assumption that folders are albums. They are also intended to function as a kind of workspace or to keep different music collections separate. The project instructs users to ensure they have an organized and structured music library, ideally with each album in its own folder. Sound advice. The software is written in the Python programming language. It uses Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA), not PulseAudio.

    COBOL, C, C++ all due for updates in early 2020s

    You have never heard of Chris Tandy, a Toronto-based programmer for IBM since 1985, but his work in standardizing computer programming languages is vital to everything you do as a software developer. Tandy chairs the American INCITS PL22 group and is an officer in the global ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 22 committee, which are the primary standards bodies responsible not only for pivotal languages such as COBOL, C, and C++, but also for historic ones like Ada, APL (famously named as "A Programming Language"), and Fortran. They also deal in esoterica—try your hand at coding in PL/1 or REXX. Future versions of the COBOL standard are now entirely in ISO hands, while before it was mostly an American project, Tandy explained. The ISO working group members intend to have the next version, known as an FDIS (final draft international standard), done in 2020. Read more Also: GNU patch another_hunk Function Double-Free Vulnerability [CVE-2018-6952]

    Kdenlive Video Editor 19.04 Arrives with Major Changes in Tow

    A major update to the Kdenlive video editor is now available for download. Kdenlive 19.04 ships as part of KDE Applications 19.04, released on April 19. This is the vaunted “refactoring” release we’ve written lots about, as the release announcement explains further: “Kdenlive has gone through an extensive re-write of its core code as more than 60% of its internals has changed, improving its overall architecture.” Read more

    Security Leftovers