Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 4.17 RC 1

Filed under
Linux
  • Kernel prepatch 4.17-rc1

    Linus has released 4.17-rc1 and closed the merge window for this release.

  • Linux 4.17-rc1
  • Linux 4.17-rc1

    So two weeks have passed, and the merge window was pretty normal and
    is now closed.

    This does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release,
    and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it. The most
    special thing that happened is purely numerology: we've passed the six
    million git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the next
    kernel 5.0. Except I probably won't, because I don't want to be too
    predictable. The version numbers are meaningless, which should mean
    that they don't even follow silly numerological rules - even if v3.0
    and v4.0 happened to be at the 2M and 4M mark respectively.

    But v5.0 will happen some day. And it should be meaningless. You have
    been warned.

    Anyway, we do have a *few* other things that happened, like Arnd
    getting rid of a number of architectures that seem to simply not
    matter any more. If it turns out that somebody wants to resurrect any
    of them, the code is all there in the git history, but you'll have to
    do the work and show that you'll maintain it and have a few users.

    And just to not make it *all* about removing old architectures,
    there's a new one in there too.

    The architectures that are gone are blackfin, cris, frv, m32r, metag,
    mn10300, score, and tile. And the new architecture is the nds32
    (Andes Technology 32-0bit RISC architecture).

    We actually have a fair amount of other removal and cleanups too. I
    was somewhat pleasantly surprised by the number of pull requests that
    actually ended up removing a lot of lines. Some of it was staging
    drivers that finally gave up the ghost (like irda), but we also got
    rid of some copyright language boiler-plate in favor of just the spdx
    lines. And some pre-shipped lexer/parser files are no more, we're
    better off just generating them.

    End result: we actually removed more lines than we added:

    13538 files changed, 627723 insertions(+), 818855 deletions(-)

    which is probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at
    least kernel releases.

    I'd call it momentous, but I think the arch removal was most of it,
    and I'm sure people will quickly rectify that momentary glitch of
    actually shrinking the kernel source code.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linux 4.17-rc1 Kernel Released: A Ton Of New Functionality While Shedding Old Code

    Just like clockwork the Linux 4.17-rc1 kernel was released tonight following the two week long merge window.

    See the Linux 4.17 features article published this morning to learn all about what's new in this kernel release. There is a ton of work from prominent AMD and Intel graphics driver updates to new hardware support and much more. As covered just a short time ago, Linux 4.17 power measurements are looking surprisingly good for lowering the power use while idling and also the power efficiency under load.

    More Linux 4.17 kernel benchmarks are on the way.

  • Linux 4.17 Offers Some Promising Power-Savings Improvements

    Of the many improvements to be found in the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel -- nicely summarized in our Linux 4.17 feature overview -- one of the features I've been anxious the most to begin benchmarking has been the reported power management improvements. Here are my initial power/performance tests of Linux 4.17 that for some systems is seeing a measurable drop in power usage, even in some cases under load while without sacrificing the performance.

  • The Many Great Features & Changes Coming For The Linux 4.17 Kernel

    Linus Torvalds is expected by the end of the day to release Linux 4.17-rc1, thereby marking the end of the two-week merge window that saw a lot of changes and new features land for Linux 4.17. Here is our original feature overview of the changes to be found in this next major release of the Linux kernel, which should premiere as stable by the middle of June.

    While many of you have likely not even upgraded yet to the feature-packed Linux 4.16, there is a lot more coming to look forward to with the Linux 4.17 kernel this summer. There are many Intel/AMD graphics driver improvements, support for obsolete CPU architectures being dropped, some new CPU support added including initial bits for the NVIDIA Xavier SoC, a potentially very big improvement for dropping Linux idle power usage, various file-system improvements, new hardware support, and even improvements for the Macintosh PowerBook 100 series from more than 20 years ago.

Linus Torvalds schedules Linux Kernel 5.0

  • Linus Torvalds schedules Linux Kernel 5.0, then maybe delays 'meaningless' release

    Linus Torvalds has suggested that the next Linux kernel could earn the number “5.0”.

    Torvalds’ suggestion came in his announcement of the first release candidate for version 4.17, which he said “does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release, and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it.”

    Unless you count the fact it is shrinking, which Torvalds liked because by removing support for eight architectures, and a bunch of other “removal and clean-ups … we actually removed more lines than we added.”

    Torvalds declared the reduction “probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at least kernel releases.”

    He also said the “most special thing that happened” in 4.17 rc1 was “purely numerology: we've passed the six million git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the next kernel 5.0.”

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Open Source Challenge: Why One Band Chose Linux To Record Their New Album
  • AMD Publishes Platform QoS Patches For Next-Gen Processors
    This afternoon AMD sent out their first Linux kernel patches for what might end up being a new feature for the "EPYC 2" / Zen 2 processors.
  • Education Ecosystem Joins Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux Foundation
    Education Ecosystem, a blockchain company building the Netflix for professional development has today announced that it is joining two nonprofit organizations. Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) the world's largest open source blockchain initiative & the Linux Foundation, an organization dedicated to building sustainable ecosystems around open source projects to accelerate technology development and industry adoption.
  • Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux partners with Netflix developer, Education Ecosystem
    The world of blockchain witnessed a new event with Education Ecosystem partnering with Linux Foundation and Enterprise Ethereum Alliance. The notification released on 25th September suggests that the latter two are non-profitable firms. Linux Foundation is one of the prominent technology developers of the world, whereas, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance [EEA] is directed towards promoting applications based on Ethereum blockchain platform.
  • openSUSE Conference 2020: Call for Hosts
    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce that it is accepting proposals for openSUSE Conference 2020. The Call for Hosts will be open until April 15, 2019. The openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will review the submissions with the hopes of having a decision announced about the location of oSC20 at the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany. Community members and open-source enthusiasts are encouraged to follow the Conference How To guide on the wiki to submit a proposal on hosting the conference. The guide offers a How to Bid and How to Checklist to help with submitting a proposal. The proposals will need to be submitted to the openSUSE Marketing mailing list and the openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will discuss the proposals as it plans this year’s conference. While the openSUSE Project intends to move the conference to different worldwide locations in the future, the project has two locations (Nuremberg, Germany, and Prague, Czech Republic) to host the annual community conference if no proposals are submitted during the Call for Hosts.
  • VLC in Debian now can do bittorrent streaming
    Back in February, I got curious to see if VLC now supported Bittorrent streaming. It did not, despite the fact that the idea and code to handle such streaming had been floating around for years. I did however find a standalone plugin for VLC to do it, and half a year later I decided to wrap up the plugin and get it into Debian. I uploaded it to NEW a few days ago, and am very happy to report that it entered Debian a few hours ago, and should be available in Debian/Unstable tomorrow, and Debian/Testing in a few days.
  • macOS Mojave Privacy Bypass Flaw Allows Access to Protected Files
  • macOS Mojave Has A Security Flaw That Lets Hackers Access Your Contacts [Ed: Apple already gives all your contacts to the US government (NSA PRISM and beyond); now it'll give these to anyone...]
    A security flaw has been unearthed in macOS Mojave, Apple’s latest desktop OS update, by a well-known security researcher Patrick Wardle. As reported by Bleeping Computer, Wardle has discovered a bypass flaw in macOS Mojave using which hackers can gain access to contacts data from the address book with the help of an app that does not have the required permissions.

Software and Games: Hegemon, Gift of Parthax, Lutris

  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitor Application Written In Rust
    When it comes to monitor running processes in Unix-like systems, the most commonly used applications are top and htop, which is an enhanced version of top. My personal favorite is htop. However, the developers are releasing few alternatives to these applications every now and then. One such alternative to top and htop utilities is Hegemon. It is a modular system monitor application written using Rust programming language.
  • Wizard arena-fighter 'Gift of Parthax' is now officially out on Linux
    Announced yesterday after a pretty short beta period, the magical arena fighting game Gift of Parthax is now officially available for Linux. Along with putting the Linux build out in public, their latest release also fixes a few bugs. The developer sent over a key and I've been testing it, the Linux version seems to be working really quite nicely. If you liked the idea of Wizard of Legend, but found it a little too fast for your tastes then Gift of Parthax might be a better fit although it's single-player only.
  • Lutris 0.4.20 is now out, to help you manage all your games plus some Overwatch testing
    I have to admit, the game manager Lutris [Official Site] has come along quite a bit since I last used it. Today, version 0.4.20 was made available. For those not aware of it, Lutris is an application that aims to give you a single place to manage all your games on Linux. It supports native games, Wine, various emulators and so on. The application itself is available under the GPL and the helper scripts to install games can be viewed before using them so it's quite nice.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • Editor's Corner—Open source is not 'one size fits all' [Ed: But that's a plus, not a minus. With proprietary software it's one unsuitable thing for everything; doesn't scale.]
    Open source communities are no doubt playing a key role in moving the telecommunications industry forward, but not everyone is on board the bandwagon. Over the past five months or so, we've spent a fair amount of time writing about open source groups and standards development organizations (SDOs) such as the Linux Foundation, MEF, Open Networking Foundation, OpenDaylight, the TM Forum and ETSI, and there's clearly more cooperation afoot for the good of the industry. But artificial intelligence startup B.Yond's chief marketing officer, Rikard Kjellberg, said his company has to be careful when it comes to choosing which open source community to commit its resources to. Kjellberg spoke to FierceTelecom on the heels of the AT&T Spark conference earlier this month.
  • Collabora Had Another Stellar Year For Open-Source Consulting
    The Collabora open-source consulting firm whose expertise spans from the Linux kernel to LibreOffice and X.Org had another successful year. The UK-based company last week reported their 2017 financial position last week providing a glimpse at the viability of open-source / free software consulting.
  • Daniel Stenberg: The Polhem prize, one year later
    Family and friends have gotten a rudimentary level of understanding of what curl is and what it does. I'm not suggesting they fully grasp it or know what an "internet protocol" is now, but at least a lot of people understand that it works with "internet transfers". It's not like people were totally uninterested before, but when I was given this prize - by a jury of engineers no less - that says this is a significant invention and accomplishment with a value that "can not be overestimated", it made them more interested. The little video that was produced helped:
  • Open Source Voice Assistant, Mycroft AI, Named Top Deal By KingsCrowd
  • Service providers increasingly adopt open source for their networks
    Communications service providers (CSPs) are increasingly keen to adopt open source technologies to deliver their services, according to research. At this week’s Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam, delegates heard that DevOps, automation, cloud, big data and analytics, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) were increasingly being supported by open source solutions. Commissioned research questioned 150 CSP representatives across 98 companies worldwide. It found that 98% of CSPs are “confident” that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions.
  • Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds
  • WLinux Distro for Windows Subsystem for Linux Now Available, openSUSE Call for Hosts, New Firefox Bug, Firefox Collecting Telemetry Data and Creative Commons Releases Significant CC Search Update
    In other Firefox news, the browser evidently is collecting telemetry data via hidden add-ons, ITWire reports. The ITWire post also quotes Mozilla's Marshall Eriwn, director of Trust and Security: "...we will measure Telemetry Coverage, which is the percentage of all Firefox users who report telemetry. The Telemetry Coverage measurement will sample a portion of all Firefox clients and report whether telemetry is enabled. This measurement will not include a client identifier and will not be associated with our standard telemetry."
  • This “Netflix For Open Source” Startup Helps Programmers Get Paid
    Open source developers, especially those who work on lesser known projects, do not get much attention or money for the work they do. While some developers are paid to work on open source projects as a part of their day jobs, they can get overwhelmed by the amount of work these projects require.
  • Portable Computing Language 1.2 Released For OpenCL On CPUs & More
    The Portable Computing Language (a.k.a. POCL or PortableCL) is the effort for getting OpenCL running on CPUs as well as other hardware for this open-source code-base that supports OpenCL 1.2 with some OpenCL 2.0+ functionality. The main "feature" of POCL 1.2 is support for LLVM Clang 7.0 as previously the support was limited to LLVM 6.0, but now this new version of LLVM is supported. The HWLOC 2.0 library is also now supported. There are also some minor feature additions like device-side printf being supported.
  • Robert O'Callahan: More Realistic Goals For C++ Lifetimes 1.0
    Over two years ago I wrote about the C++ Lifetimes proposal and some of my concerns about it. Just recently, version 1.0 was released with a blog post by Herb Sutter. Comparing the two versions shows many important changes. The new version is much clearer and more worked-out, but there are also significant material changes. In particular the goal has changed dramatically.