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Linux 4.17 RC 1

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Linux
  • Kernel prepatch 4.17-rc1

    Linus has released 4.17-rc1 and closed the merge window for this release.

  • Linux 4.17-rc1
  • Linux 4.17-rc1

    So two weeks have passed, and the merge window was pretty normal and
    is now closed.

    This does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release,
    and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it. The most
    special thing that happened is purely numerology: we've passed the six
    million git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the next
    kernel 5.0. Except I probably won't, because I don't want to be too
    predictable. The version numbers are meaningless, which should mean
    that they don't even follow silly numerological rules - even if v3.0
    and v4.0 happened to be at the 2M and 4M mark respectively.

    But v5.0 will happen some day. And it should be meaningless. You have
    been warned.

    Anyway, we do have a *few* other things that happened, like Arnd
    getting rid of a number of architectures that seem to simply not
    matter any more. If it turns out that somebody wants to resurrect any
    of them, the code is all there in the git history, but you'll have to
    do the work and show that you'll maintain it and have a few users.

    And just to not make it *all* about removing old architectures,
    there's a new one in there too.

    The architectures that are gone are blackfin, cris, frv, m32r, metag,
    mn10300, score, and tile. And the new architecture is the nds32
    (Andes Technology 32-0bit RISC architecture).

    We actually have a fair amount of other removal and cleanups too. I
    was somewhat pleasantly surprised by the number of pull requests that
    actually ended up removing a lot of lines. Some of it was staging
    drivers that finally gave up the ghost (like irda), but we also got
    rid of some copyright language boiler-plate in favor of just the spdx
    lines. And some pre-shipped lexer/parser files are no more, we're
    better off just generating them.

    End result: we actually removed more lines than we added:

    13538 files changed, 627723 insertions(+), 818855 deletions(-)

    which is probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at
    least kernel releases.

    I'd call it momentous, but I think the arch removal was most of it,
    and I'm sure people will quickly rectify that momentary glitch of
    actually shrinking the kernel source code.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linux 4.17-rc1 Kernel Released: A Ton Of New Functionality While Shedding Old Code

    Just like clockwork the Linux 4.17-rc1 kernel was released tonight following the two week long merge window.

    See the Linux 4.17 features article published this morning to learn all about what's new in this kernel release. There is a ton of work from prominent AMD and Intel graphics driver updates to new hardware support and much more. As covered just a short time ago, Linux 4.17 power measurements are looking surprisingly good for lowering the power use while idling and also the power efficiency under load.

    More Linux 4.17 kernel benchmarks are on the way.

  • Linux 4.17 Offers Some Promising Power-Savings Improvements

    Of the many improvements to be found in the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel -- nicely summarized in our Linux 4.17 feature overview -- one of the features I've been anxious the most to begin benchmarking has been the reported power management improvements. Here are my initial power/performance tests of Linux 4.17 that for some systems is seeing a measurable drop in power usage, even in some cases under load while without sacrificing the performance.

  • The Many Great Features & Changes Coming For The Linux 4.17 Kernel

    Linus Torvalds is expected by the end of the day to release Linux 4.17-rc1, thereby marking the end of the two-week merge window that saw a lot of changes and new features land for Linux 4.17. Here is our original feature overview of the changes to be found in this next major release of the Linux kernel, which should premiere as stable by the middle of June.

    While many of you have likely not even upgraded yet to the feature-packed Linux 4.16, there is a lot more coming to look forward to with the Linux 4.17 kernel this summer. There are many Intel/AMD graphics driver improvements, support for obsolete CPU architectures being dropped, some new CPU support added including initial bits for the NVIDIA Xavier SoC, a potentially very big improvement for dropping Linux idle power usage, various file-system improvements, new hardware support, and even improvements for the Macintosh PowerBook 100 series from more than 20 years ago.

Linus Torvalds schedules Linux Kernel 5.0

  • Linus Torvalds schedules Linux Kernel 5.0, then maybe delays 'meaningless' release

    Linus Torvalds has suggested that the next Linux kernel could earn the number “5.0”.

    Torvalds’ suggestion came in his announcement of the first release candidate for version 4.17, which he said “does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release, and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it.”

    Unless you count the fact it is shrinking, which Torvalds liked because by removing support for eight architectures, and a bunch of other “removal and clean-ups … we actually removed more lines than we added.”

    Torvalds declared the reduction “probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at least kernel releases.”

    He also said the “most special thing that happened” in 4.17 rc1 was “purely numerology: we've passed the six million git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the next kernel 5.0.”

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