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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Into The Unknown - My Departure from RedHat

    In May 2006, a young starry eyed intern walked into the large corporate lobby of RedHat's Centential Campus in Raleigh, NC, beginning what would be a 12 years journey full of ups and downs, break-throughs and setbacks, and many many memories. Flash forward to April 2018, when the "intern-turned-hardend-software-enginner" filed his resignation and ended his tenure at RedHat to venture into the risky but exciting world of self-employment / entrepreneurship... Incase you were wondering that former-intern / Software Engineer is myself, and after nearly 12 years at RedHat, I finished my last day of employment on Friday April 13th, 2018.

    Overall RedHat has been a great experience, I was able to work on many ground-breaking products and technologies, with many very talented individuals from across the spectrum and globe, in a manner that facilitated maximum professional and personal growth. It wasn't all sunshine and lolipops though, there were many setbacks, including many cancelled projects and dead-ends. That being said, I felt I was always able to speak my mind without fear of reprocussion, and always strived to work on those items that mattered the most and had the furthest reaching impact.

  • Wedbush Securities Cut Its Abbvie (ABBV) Holding; Red Hat (RHT)’s Sentiment Is 1.12
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) held by 74 SEC 13F Filers
  • Fedora Infrastructure hackfest 2018

    Last week I had the pleasure of attending the 2018 Infrastructure Hackfest in Fredricksberg, VA. It was a very productive week and very nice to meet up face to face with a lot of folks I work with mostly over IRC and email.

    Travel went pretty well for me (direct flights, 4-5 hours each way) and the hotel worked out nicely. I liked that the hotel had a big table (with power!) in the corner of the lobby for us to use in evenings for more hacking. Our day workspace was a classroom at a nearby grad college. Aside from some firewall issues monday morning (They were blocking everything but 80/443) it worked pretty well too. Lots of tables we could move around, and whiteboards/projector.

  • Fedora 28 Anaconda Test Day 2018-04-16
  • Fedora 28 : The VS Code on Fedora.

More in Tux Machines

NomadBSD 1.2 released!

We are pleased to announce the release of NomadBSD 1.2! We would like to thank all the testers who sent us feedback and bug reports. Read more

Review: Alpine Linux 3.9.2

Alpine Linux is different in some important ways compared to most other distributions. It uses different libraries, it uses a different service manager (than most), it has different command line tools and a custom installer. All of this can, at first, make Alpine feel a bit unfamiliar, a bit alien. But what I found was that, after a little work had been done to get the system up and running (and after a few missteps on my part) I began to greatly appreciate the distribution. Alpine is unusually small and requires few resources. Even the larger Extended edition I was running required less than 100MB of RAM and less than a gigabyte of disk space after all my services were enabled. I also appreciated that Alpine ships with some security features, like PIE, and does not enable any services it does not need to run. I believe it is fair to say this distribution requires more work to set up. Installing Alpine is not a point-n-click experience, it's more manual and requires a bit of typing. Not as much as setting up Arch Linux, but still more work than average. Setting up services requires a little more work and, in some cases, reading too since Alpine works a little differently than mainstream Linux projects. I repeatedly found it was a good idea to refer to the project's wiki to learn which steps were different on Alpine. What I came away thinking at the end of my trial, and I probably sound old (or at least old fashioned), is Alpine Linux reminds me of what got me into running Linux in the first place, about 20 years ago. Alpine is fast, light, and transparent. It offered very few surprises and does almost nothing automatically. This results in a little more effort on our parts, but it means that Alpine does not do things unless we ask it to perform an action. It is lean, efficient and does not go around changing things or trying to guess what we want to do. These are characteristics I sometimes miss these days in the Linux ecosystem. Read more

today's howtos

Linux v5.1-rc6

It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow. The occasional scuba trip? Sure. But everybody sitting around eating traditional foods? No. You have to have priorities. There's only so much memma you can eat even if your wife had to make it from scratch because nobody eats that stuff in the US. Anyway, rc6 is actually larger than I would have liked, which made me go back and look at history, and for some reason that's not all that unusual. We recently had similar rc6 bumps in both 4.18 and 5.0. So I'm not going to worry about it. I think it's just random timing of pull requests, and almost certainly at least partly due to the networking pull request in here (with just over a third of the changes being networking-related, either in drivers or core networking). Read more Also: Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message