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Egmde in Ubuntu and Making It Look Like Vista 10

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Ubuntu
  • Egmde: keymap and wallpaper

    I recently (re)introduced a simple shell based on Mir: egmde. This shell is just the code needed to illustrate these articles and, maybe, inspire others to build on it but it is not intended to be a product.

    At the end of the last article we could run egmde as a desktop and run and use Wayland based applications.
    Those of us in Europe (or elsewhere outside the USA) will soon notice that the keyboard layout has defaulted to US, so I’ll show how to fix that. And the black background is rather depressing, so I’ll show how to implement a simple wallpaper; and, finally, how to allow the user to customize the wallpaper.

  • Hacking With Mir's EGMDE Desktop To Support Different Keymaps, Custom Wallpapers

    At the end of March longtime Mir developer Alan Griffiths of Canonical announced EGMDE, the Mir Desktop Environment as a desktop example implementing Mir/MirAL APIs and supporting Wayland clients. Griffiths has now put out his latest article in guiding interested developers in working with the code.

  • Want to make Ubuntu look like Windows 10?

    As a man with a keen eye for aesthetic details, I do like the concept of trying to make operating systems mimic their rivals, provided this can be done with elegance, style, quality and attention to detail. A great example would be the Macbuntu transformation pack. Including but not limited to.

    Now, Windows 10. Say what you will about it, it ain't ugly. It's actually a reasonably pretty distro, although the whole flatness deal is a bit overplayed. But since Linux can be made to look like anything, I set about testing, in Ubuntu, Kubuntu and even Linux Mint, to see whether this is something worth your time and decorative skills in the first place. Will this work? An open question. After me.

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