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Security: Cleartext Passwords, Windows Problems, and Meltdown Patches/Performance

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Security
  • cleartext passwords and transparency

    So let me just jump in with Lars blog post where he talks about cleartext passwords. While he has actually surmised and shared what a security problem they are, the pity is we come to know of this only because the people in question tacitly admitted to bad practises. How many more such bad actors are there, developers putting user credentials in cleartext god only knows. There was even an April Fool’s joke in 2014 which shared why putting passwords in cleartext is bad.

  • 911 operator suspended over teen’s death griped about working overtime.

    Plush called 911 again around 3:35 p.m., this time giving Smith a description of the vehicle, a gold Honda Odyssey in the parking lot at Seven Hills — information that never made it to the officers at the scene.

    “This is not a joke,” the teen told Smith. “I’m almost dead.”

    Smith tried to document the call when it came in but her computer screen had frozen, preventing her from entering information immediately, the review found.

  • Defense contractors face more aggressive ransomware attacks

    The rise of ransomware attacks against defense contractors coincides with a rise in the use of ransomware in general. Attacks can spread even after the original target has been hit, hurting unintended victims.

  • A Look At The Meltdown Performance Impact With DragonFlyBSD 5.2

    Besides looking at the HAMMER2 performance in DragonFlyBSD 5.2, another prominent change with this new BSD operating system release is the Spectre and Meltdown mitigations being shipped. In this article are some tests looking at the performance cost of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 for mitigating the Meltdown Intel CPU vulnerability.

    With DragonFlyBSD 5.2 there is the machdep.meltdown_mitigation sysctl for checking on the Meltdown mitigation presence and toggling it. Back in January we ran some tests of DragonFlyBSD's Meltdown mitigation using the page table isolation approach while now testing was done using the DragonFlyBSD 5.2 stable release.

  • A Last Minute Linux 4.17 Pull To Help Non-PCID Systems With KPTI Meltdown Performance

    While the Linux 4.17 kernel merge window is closing today and is already carrying a lot of interesting changes as covered by our Linux 4.17 feature overview, Thomas Gleixner today sent in a final round of x86 (K)PTI updates for Meltdown mitigation with this upcoming kernel release.

    This latest round of page-table isolation updates should help out systems lacking PCID, Process Context Identifiers. The KPTI code makes use of PCID for reducing the performance overhead of this Meltdown mitigation technique. PCID has been around since the Intel Westmere days, but now the latest kernel patches will help offset the KPTI performance impact for systems lacking PCID.

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