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Novell and Microsoft’s deal - A Call to Action

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Novell bit the hand that feeds it. The Novell/Microsoft announcement reminds me of the saying, “Communism is a great concept, on paper”. This deal sounds nice, especially to the uninformed. A kinder, gentler Microsoft had a hard look in the mirror, and using the words of Rodney King said, “Can’t we all just get along?”. They and Novell worked out a way to help Microsoft and Linux to work together. If you can’t beat them, join them. Microsoft loves its customers and recognized that they were using Linux. Why not join Novell and make it easier for their customers to use a competitor?

It was clear what Microsoft’s motivations were. They made a covenant to not sue any developer as long as you are, in their term, a “Non-Compensated Individual Hobbyist Developer”. Thanks! As long as I develop software and do not share it with anyone or receive compensation for it, Microsoft pledges not to sue me. Novell really has helped out the community with this deal! What they are saying is who they may sue, namely, anyone who creates Free Software not using the Microsoft approved channel. The implication is that there are patent violations, but we are left guessing as to what these are. This helps to create fear to companies who may have considered a switch to Linux. It looks to them that they can either run Novell’s Linux or possibly get sued.

If this was truly about partnership and acceptance of Linux, why from day one were lawsuits being discussed?

Full Story.

Sydney Novell user group welcomes MS deal

The president of the Sydney Novell User Group (SNUG) expects end users to benefit from Novell's new relationship with software giant Microsoft, but remains suspicious about Redmond's intentions.

David Hayes believes the most obvious benefit will be from Novell and Microsoft employees dealing with customers using each others' products.

Microsoft currently doesn't answer queries from its customers about Novell's software but this is set to change. "Microsoft will no longer push service calls to Novell when they know there's an answer," Hayes told ZDNet Australia.

"I think that culture might take time to actually filter through their service technical departments, to say: if you know the answer, give it out," he added.

Full Story.

You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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