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Mozilla Leftovers: New Release of Firefox and Lots More

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Moz/FF
  • Latest Firefox available to users where they browse the web — laptop, Fire TV and the office. Plus, a chance to help with the next Firefox release!
  • Firefox 59 “Quantum” released

    Mozilla has released its Firefox 59.0 “Quantum” browser.

    The browser supports GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows desktop operating systems, and iOS and Android mobile devices.

  • Firefox 59 released, these are the key changes
  • Mozilla's Firefox 59 Released, New Agones Project, SparkyLinux 5.3 Available, Hunt for Exoplanets and More

    Mozilla's Firefox 59 is available for download. See the wiki for more information on its new features, including the "option to stop websites from asking to send notifications or access your device's camera, microphone, and location".

  • IT Pros and CIOs: sign up to try Firefox Quantum for Enterprise
  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Mozilla files response to European Commission ‘Fake news and online disinformation’ public consultation
  • Can Chrome Sync or Firefox Sync be trusted with sensitive data?
  • Mozilla Foundation is seeking a VP, Leadership Programs

    One of Mozilla’s biggest strengths is the people — a global community of engineers, designers, educators, lawyers, scientists, researchers, artists, activists and every day users brought together with the common goal of making the internet healthier.

    A big part of Mozilla Foundation’s focus over the past few years has been increasing both the size and diversity of this community and the broader moveme. In particular, we’ve run a series of initiatives — the Internet Health Report, MozFest, our fellowships and awards — aimed at connecting and supporting people who want to take a leadership role in this community. Our global community is the lynchpin in our strategy to grow a global movement to create a healthier digital world.

  • Side projects and swag-driven development

    Another option I keep hearing is to push Mozilla leadership into making side-projects real. That seems like a good option and I think it happens periodically. I sort of did this with Bleach. I spent tons of time trying to get Bleach turned into a real project and it sort of is now.

    Based on that experience, I think it requires a bunch of people and meetings to come to a consensus on validating the project's existence which is a lot of work and takes a lot of time. It's important that projects paid for by budgets have impact and value and all that--I get that--but the work to get a side-project to that point is unpleasant and time-consuming. I bet many side-projects can't pass muster to become a real project. I think what happens instead is that side-projects continue to exist in the misty "there be dragons" part of the Mozilla universe map until the relevant people leave and stuff breaks.

    There are probably other options.

    I've been wondering about an option where where the maintainers aren't locked into choosing between walking away and guilt-driven development for a project that's important, but for some reason doesn't have a critical mass and doesn't pass muster enough to turn into a real project.

    I started wondering if my problem with Standups is two fold: first, I have no incentive to work on it other than bad feelings, and second, it's a free service so no one else has incentive to work on it either.

    One incentive is getting paid in money, but that's messy, problematic, and hard to do. But what if we used a different currency? There's a lot of swag at Mozilla. What if we could use swag to drive development?

  • So, How’s Screenshots Doing?

    It’s been a bit over five months since we launched Firefox Screenshots in Firefox 56, and I wanted to take a moment to reflect on what’s happened so far and to look forward to what’s coming next.

    So far, our users have taken more than 67 million screenshots. This is a big number that makes my manager happy, but more interesting is how we got here.

  • March Add(on)ness is here

    Winter’s icy hand is releasing its grip, birds are returning from southern migration which means it’s that time of year where people everywhere rank things, put them in brackets and have them compete for bragging rights over who’s the best. It’s time for March Add(on)ness!

  • A Truly Responsive WebXR Experiment: A-Painter XR

    In our posts announcing our Mixed Reality program last year, we talked about some of the reasons we were excited to expand WebVR to include AR technology. In the post about our experimental WebXR Polyfill and WebXR Viewer, we mentioned that the WebVR Community Group has shifted to become the Immersive Web Community Group and the WebVR API proposal is becoming the WebXR Device API proposal. As the community works through the details of these these changes, this is a great time to step back and think about the requirements and implications of mixing AR and VR in one API.

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