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Linux Foundation: ACRN, CNCF, AGL With Listening Device Support

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  • The Linux Foundation Announces an Open Source Reference Hypervisor Project Designed for IoT Device Development

    ACRN is comprised of two main components: the hypervisor and its device model, complete with rich I/O mediators. Intel's experience and leadership in virtualization technology was key to the initial development of this hypervisor solution.

  • Dell EMC: The Next Big Shift in Open Networking Is Here [Ed: "This article was sponsored by Dell EMC..." (LF still takes money to write puff pieces/ads, even for Microsoft)]
  • CNCF Webinar to Present New Data on Container Adoption and Kubernetes Users in China

    Last year, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) conducted its first Mandarin-language survey of the Kubernetes community. While the organization published the early results of the English-language survey in a December blog post, the Mandarin survey results will be released on March 20 in a webinar with Huawei and The New Stack.

    Many of China’s largest cloud providers and telecom companies — including Alibaba Cloud, Baidu, Ghostcloud, Huawei and ZTE — have joined the CNCF. And the first KubeCon + CloudNativeCon China will be held in Beijing later this year.

  • 4 Themes From the Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS)

    This week we attended The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS) in Sonoma. Over the past three decades infrastructure open source software (OSS) has evolved from Linux and the Apache web server to touching almost every component of the infrastructure stack. We see OSS’s widespread reach from MySQL and PostgreSQL for databases, OpenContrail and OpenDaylight for networking to Openstack and Kubernetes for cloud operating systems. Its increasing influence up and down the stack is best exemplified by the explosion of solutions included on the Cloud Native Landscape that Redpoint co-published with Amplify and the CNCF.

  • Amazon Embraces Open Source to Compete with Google Assistant on Cars

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project hosted by Linux foundation which aims to build a truly open, Linux based platform and framework for automotive applications. Currently, the market is utterly dominated by Android Auto and Apple Car Play. AGL, when it debuts in 2018 Toyota Camry, will be a more neutral, open, and inter-operable alternative to Android Auto and iOS CarPlay.

    Amazon on the other hand is working with Nuance Communications Inc. and Voicebox Technologies Corp. to write code that makes AGL's in-vehicle apps compatible with several voice-assistant technologies (and not just Amazon's Alexa), eliminating the need for developers to make multiple versions. Given the fact that most automakers are also trying to diversify away from Google and Apple's restrictive eco-systems, this could eventually turn into a major win for all parties involved, including consumers.

More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.