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Linux, Microsoft, and Polls

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Linux 4.17 Will Be Another Exciting Kernel Cycle

    While the Linux 4.16 kernel release is still three weeks or so away, the Linux 4.17 kernel is already shaping up to be another exciting cycle.

  • Microsoft Helps Get A Computer Recycler Sentenced To 15 Months In Prison For Offering Unapproved Recovery Disks

    To ensure no good deed goes unpunished, Microsoft is trying to get a computer recycler tossed in prison because he almost provided Windows recovery disks to users who needed them. Eric Lundgren, who's made heroic efforts to prevent dangerous computer parts from filling landfills, is facing a 15-month sentence and a $50,000 fine for manufacturing 28,000 recovery disks. His sentence is based on two charges: conspiracy and copyright infringement.

    Tom Jackman has the whole story at the Washington Post and it's half-tragedy, half-farce. Lundgren runs a company that prevents tens of millions of pounds of harmful chemicals and metals from ending up in landfills. In return for doing more than his part to save the planet, he'll gets a chance to spend a year in jail and hand Microsoft $50,000 in compensation for sales it never "lost" from recovery discs he never got a chance to distribute.

  • Best Laptop

    The ThinkPad began life at IBM, but in 2005, it was purchased by Lenovo along with the rest of IBM's PC business. Lenovo evolved the line, and today the company is well known as a geek favorite. Lenovo's ThinkPads are quiet, fast and arguably have one of the best keyboards (fighting words!). Linux Journal readers say Lenovo's Linux support is excellent, leaving many to ponder why the company doesn't ship laptops with Linux installed.

  • Best Linux Desktop Environment

More in Tux Machines

Happy birthday, qutebrowser!

That's how qutebrowser looked a day after that (and that commit still seems to run!): https://imgur.com/a/xoG1r4G Exactly a year later, things were finally ready for a v0.1 release, after spending two weeks of holidays with fixing bugs. Originally, qutebrowser was born because the dwb project was discontinued: https://portix.bitbucket.io/dwb/ That's what I (and many others) were using at the time, and all alternatives were stuck with an unmaintained WebKit1. Since everything was using WebKitGTK which was horribly buggy (and WebKit2 in WebKitGTK lacked a lot of basic features), I decided to start my own thing, based on Qt instead. Back then, there were already discussions about QtWebEngine, and I originally wondered whether I should just wait with starting qutebrowser until it's ready. QtWebEngine support was finally added in July 2016, a lot later than I imagined. Initially, many features didn't work yet, but in September 2017 it finally became the default backend. Later, it turned out that qutebrowser also was a viable alternative for many Pentadactyl/Vimperator refugees, and qutebrowser got more popular than I ever imagined. Read more

This week in Usability & Productivity, part 49

There’s big news in Usability & Productivity: Firefox 64 can now use native KDE open/save dialogs! Read more

Android Leftovers

Arch Family: ArcoLinux 18.12.7 Run Through, Manjaro Linux Stuff and Arch Linux at Reproducible Build Summit Paris