Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Quick Look at Urli OS 6.10

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Urli 6.10 is an Debian/Ubuntu derived Linux OS developed in Argentina. It was recently added to distrowatch's waiting list and sounded a bit interesting given that their motto seems to be "Linux like never before!" Well, this I had to see.

Their site seems to be in espanol although there is a translation for the download agreement. It's a fairly nice looking site, powered by Drupal btw, tasteful, uncluttered and functional. Although my high school Spanish was enough to navigate around the site and even catch most of their main points, I was still hoping English would be available in their system. It is. In fact, if you change the language of the download agreement to English, it will link to the English download of Urli.

Urli OS seems aimed towards the Window user as their site makes mention of being "without viruses" a few times during the introductory "what we have to offer" info. As their screenshots looked nice, I decided to give it a download.

The download was quite slow as is commonly found with newer smaller projects, but it finally got here unscrambled and uncorrupt. It presents in an installable livecd. The boot is very Ubuntu-like, save for replacing the Ubuntu logo for their Urli logo. It logs you in automagically into its KDE 3.5.2 desktop. The theme consists of various shades of grays. The wallpaper is a blending of darker gray into a lighter gray, almost blue color with a white Urli logo in the center and their distro name with smaller logo at the lower right corner. They are using KBFX to dress up their panel and start button, but retain the stock KDE menu. The windec is a dark gray, almost black version of Crystal coupled with the Plastic style. Overall it's quite an attractive package. It also comes with a coupla other backgrounds, one of almost all white and another of a yellowish-orangy color.

        

The menus aren't overflowing with variety, but they are ample enough for a one cd download. There are apps to take care of one's general purpose needs. Among others, these include mplayer, amarok, OpenOffice.org, Firefox, aMSN, gimp, kooka, and evolution. All seemed to open and function rather well in the short amount of time I tested them. I had no problems. The video players did a wonderful job of playing the video files I had on hand. Surprisingly, most were rather snappy as well.

        

Also found in the menu are your basic system tools and utilities as well as some configuration wizards and such. Adept is included for package management with repositories already set up. Unfortunately, it didn't seem to want to install anything. Clicking install for a chosen package did nothing. Also present is the System Settings as found in Kubuntu as well as KDE's Control Center.

Found on the desktop is this "Introduction to UrliOS" icon. Clicking it brings up konqueror to a html help-like page. It introduces one to some of the capabilities or features of the system. It's still a bit thin at this time, but I'm sure there will be more to come. It's got a pretty good start right now.

    

UrliOS comes with Kubutu's harddrive installer. It's the same exact process, but I wasn't able to finish my install here due to the number of partitions available. I wasn't able to adjust the window size to access and setup my swap partition. If I recall, it took some crafty window manipulation to complete this step in Kubuntu. But it would probably work fine for most folks' computers. One note of interest to mention was the second window that mentions, "Register your copy of UrliOS 6.1 and get 3 months of free support."

    

Hardware support was good, I didn't really have to set up anything upon boot. I did have to adjust the the X server settings, but that's par for the course for me and my two vastly differing monitors. Otherwise sound, usb, printer, etc seemed ready to go. System performance was amazing as mentioned before. The only slow downs occurred when opening OpenOffice.org. Stability wasn't a problem either. The system acted real nice. I had no crashes or misbehaving applications in my short test drive. Overall I was impressed.

However, Urli OS is basically a nicer Kubuntu. I'm afraid I'm not acquainted with Kubuntu well enough to distinguish much difference in the two systems other than the outward appearances. Well, there are several application differences as well. I liked Urli overall, but it's just not a whole lot different than Kubuntu to me.

More in Tux Machines

Munich Reversal Turnaround, Linus on the Desktop, and Red Hat Time Protocol

Monday we reported that Munich was throwing in the Linux towel, but today we find that may not be exactly the case. In other news, Linus Torvalds today said he still wants the desktop. There are lots of other LinuxCon links and a few gaming posts to highlight. And finally today, Red Hat's Eric Dube explains RHEL 7's new time protocol. Read more

NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions. Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”. The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”. Read more

What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point. Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux. Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development. "We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said. Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations. Read more

Arch-based Linux distro KaOS 2014.08 is here with KDE 4.14.0

The Linux desktop community has reached a sad state. Ubuntu 14.04 was a disappointing release and Fedora is taking way too long between releases. Hell, OpenSUSE is an overall disaster. It is hard to recommend any Linux-based operating system beyond Mint. Even the popular KDE plasma environment and its associated programs are in a transition phase, moving from 4.x to 5.x. As exciting as KDE 5 may be, it is still not ready for prime-time; it is recommended to stay with 4 for now. Read more