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Graphics: OpenChrome, FP64, Wine/Vulkan, QC1

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  • OpenChrome KMS Can Now Do Runtime Resolution Changes, Hopes To Go Mainline In 2018

    The OpenChrome KMS/DRM driver can finally handle run-time resolution changes without crashing. The developer now hopes to be able to mainline this driver into the Linux kernel in 2018.

    OpenChrome KMS previously has been unable to handle run-time resolution changes without crashing the X.Org Server, but now this kernel mode-setting driver can do so. After previously battling a standby resume problem for OpenChrome KMS and now tackling this screen resolution change crash, developer Kevin Brace is now able to get by without regular crashes to his computer. This now puts the OpenChrome KMS support about on-par with the DDX driver's user-space mode-setting support.

  • OpenChrome DRM Driver To Work On New GEM/TTM Code, Regression Fixes

    Now that the OpenChrome DRM driver is hoping to go mainline in 2018 now that it can handle run-time resolution changes without crashing the X.Org Server, the project's lone developer Kevin Brace has published a TODO list of other code changes he has planned prior to getting this open-source VIA x86 graphics driver into the mainline Linux kernel.

  • David Airlie Moves Toward Upstreaming Soft FP64 Support In Mesa

    There's been work going on for years of "soft" FP64 support to allow emulated support for the double-precision floating-point data types for GPUs not otherwise inherently supporting this capability. The soft support would allow for some older GPUs to then advertise OpenGL 4.0+ support now that ARB_gpu_shader_fp64 support could be enabled. That day looks like it's finally coming for mainline Mesa.

  • Vulkan WSI Support Is The Latest Being Worked On For Wine

    Following more Wine Vulkan code being merged and the first milestone being achieved of vulkaninfo working, Roderick Colenbrander has submitted his latest patches in the bring-up of Vulkan support under Wine.

  • This Cryptocoin Miner Uses GPU Heat To Warm Up Your Room

    Now, a French startup Qarnot has added way new name to the list: a crypto heater. Yes, you heard that right. The heater, called QC1, can warm up your room while its mines crypto coins. To do so, it houses two Sapphire Nitro + Radeon GPU RX 580 GPUs with 8GB VRAM each.

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  • Linux Foundation announces open source ACRN hypervisor for the Internet of Things
    ACRN's small footprint is partly attributable to the fact that it takes a mere 25,000 lines of code for a hypervisor. There's already involvement from the likes of ADLINK, Aptiv, Intel Corporation, LG Electronics and Neusoft Corporation, and it's likely that many more names will join this list.
  • Linux Foundation Announces ACRN —Open Source Hypervisor for IoT Devices
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  • Linux Foundation backs new ‘ACRN’ hypervisor for embedded and IoT
    The Linux Foundation has announced a new hypervizor for use in embedded and internet of things scenarios. Project ACRN (pronounced “acorn”) will offer a “hypervizor, and its device model complete with rich I/O mediators.” There’ll also be “a Linux-based Service OS” and the ability to “run guest operating systems (another Linux instance, an RTOS, Android, or other operating systems) simultaneously”.

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS: What’s New?

Ahead of the Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS release next month you may be wondering what new features and changes the update will bring. Well, wonder no more. In this post we round up all of the key information about the next release of one Ubuntu’s most popular community flavors. Read more