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Events: LF's Open Networking Summit, Free Software Events in Europe in 2018, Belated FOSDEM Coverage

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  • Hands-On Learning at Open Networking Summit for Your SDN/NFV Deployments

    If you are attending ONS, you know the value of open source projects. You know they are going to play a critical role in your ongoing or upcoming SDN/NFV transformation. Open source projects have become very successful in the enterprise space and they are poised to do the same in the communications service provider (CSP) arena.

    That leads to a question—how can you learn more about these projects, determine their value for your specific environment and map out your organization’s next steps? Certainly, you can review online materials on your own. However, if you are like me and learn best when another human being is providing or explaining the material starting with the basics, at an unhurried pace, then the ONAP and OPNFV training sessions offered onsite at Open Networking Summit in Los Angeles are something to consider. These training courses will empower you to integrate open source into your NFV/SDN deployments.

  • Free Software Events in Europe in 2018

    If you know a Free Software and Open Source Software related event in Europe, happening in 2018, that is not yet listed here but that you think is in interest to the FSFE community, please leave it in this pad or contact me directly. All valid events will be imported from here into our wiki calendar.

    Valid events do not need to be a conference, they can be install fests or other activities. But to be in interest for our community, they have to be for the general public and happen in Europe.

  • Avoiding license violations in a large organization

    Over the years, I have heard people from the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) say many times that most free-software license violations are not intentional. Indeed, the SFC's principles of community-oriented enforcement say that "most GPL violations occur by mistake, without ill will". I've always had some difficulty in believing that; after all, how hard can it be to create a GPL repository on GitHub and sync the code into it? But it is also said that managing programmers is like herding cats. It was therefore interesting to hear a large-scale cat herder talk at FOSDEM 2018 about the license violations that occurred in their organization and what he and his colleagues did about it.

    Andreas Schreiber works for DLR, Germany's national aeronautics and space research center. DLR has some 8,000 employees across 40 institutions at 20 sites; of those, around 1,500 work on software development. Schreiber said its annual budget of some €150M for software development makes DLR one of the largest software developers in Germany. However, it is primarily an academic institution. Unlike many large commercial software developers, its software is largely written by people employed because of their expertise in such fields as aeronautics and space transportation, who have no formal computer science background, and often no formal training in software development.


    Schreiber also noted that both NASA and ESA have developed their own open-source licenses, whereas DLR has deliberately chosen not to do that. Given widespread concerns about license proliferation, and that NASA's license is both non-free and GPL-incompatible, this seems a good decision. In addition, in response to a later question, Schreiber said his group has tried mandating licenses for DLR projects, but that just did not work in the DLR culture, where researchers are used to doing what they like, how they like. Imposing a single institutional license would have been difficult; instead, the group provides advice and support, it will even recommend if asked to, but it doesn't mandate.

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