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Server: Supercomputing, Kubernetes and More

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  • Supercomputing under a new lens: A Sandia-developed benchmark re-ranks top computers

    A Sandia National Laboratories software program now installed as an additional test for the widely observed TOP500 supercomputer challenge has become increasingly prominent. The program’s full name — High Performance Conjugate Gradients, or HPCG — doesn’t come trippingly to the tongue, but word is seeping out that this relatively new benchmarking program is becoming as valuable as its venerable partner — the High Performance LINPACK program — which some say has become less than satisfactory in measuring many of today’s computational challenges.

  • Bright Computing adds support for OpenHPC

    Today Bright Computing announced it has joined the Linux Foundation and will participate in the OpenHPC Community project. The latest release of Bright Cluster Manager provides the ability for Bright customers to easily integrate OpenHPC libraries and packages for use within a Bright cluster.

  • Kubernetes Becomes The First Project To Graduate From The Cloud Native Computing Foundation
  • Usenet, Authentication, and Engineering (or: Early Design Decisions for Usenet)

    A Twitter thread on trolls brought up mention of trolls on Usenet. The reason they were so hard to deal with, even then, has some lessons for today; besides, the history is interesting. (Aside: this is, I think, the first longish thing I've ever written about any of the early design decisions for Usenet. I should note that this is entirely my writing, and memory can play many tricks across nearly 40 years.)

  • The true costs of hosting in the cloud

    Should we host in the cloud or on our own servers? This question was at the center of Dmytro Dyachuk's talk, given during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon last November. While many services simply launch in the cloud without the organizations behind them considering other options, large content-hosting services have actually moved back to their own data centers: Dropbox migrated in 2016 and Instagram in 2014. Because such transitions can be expensive and risky, understanding the economics of hosting is a critical part of launching a new service. Actual hosting costs are often misunderstood, or secret, so it is sometimes difficult to get the numbers right. In this article, we'll use Dyachuk's talk to try to answer the "million dollar question": "buy or rent?"

  • Memcached DDoS Attacks Slow Down as Patching Ramps Up

    Days after the largest distributed denial-of-service attack in internet history, the attack size of memcached DDoS attacks is now on the decline.

    On March 5, Netscout Arbor Networks reported a 1.7-Tbps DDoS attack that was driven by the amplification of misconfigured memcached servers. While there were some initial fears that the attacks would continue to grow in size, the opposite has happened.

    "We're still seeing lots of them, but their average size is considerably smaller due to ongoing cleanup and mitigation efforts," Steinthor Bjarnason, senior network security analyst at Netscout Arbor, told eWEEK.

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