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KDE:Amarok 2.9 Released, Qt for WebAssembly, KaOS 2018.01, KDE Discover, Skrooge 2.12.0, Krita 4.1, GTK Global Menu

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  • Amarok 2.9 Released As The Last Step Before Qt5/KF5

    The KDE developers working on the Amarok music player released version 2.9.0 this week as their last expected release atop the aging KDE 4 libraries and Qt4.

  • Amarok 2.9.0 "Hibernaculum" released

    As it may be customary for the upcoming season the Amarok team did some spring cleaning and is proud to announce the immediate release of Amarok 2.9.0. While we realize that the clock has run out on KDELibs 4 and Qt 4, we wanted to bring 20+ bug fixes from 18 contributors to our users before the next major release will harness all the shiny new things provided by Qt 5 and KDE Frameworks 5. In fact, the port is already progressing nicely in the Git 'kf5' branch, which is soon to become the new ‘master’ branch. We welcome everybody willing to help out to check out the source code and improve the next major version of Amarok!

  • [Development] Qt for WebAssembly

    As you may have noticed work on Qt for WebAssembly is underway. W

  • Qt Developers Begin Brewing Their WebAssembly Plans

    The Qt Company developers are soliciting feedback from developers and the community about what they would like to see out of WebAssembly support for the tool-kit.

    WebAssembly is now supported by all major web browsers as a binary format for allowing sandboxed executable code in web pages that is nearly as fast as native machine code. Many different projects are figuring out how to make use of WASM or offer support for it moving forward, including the Qt tool-kit.

  • What’s New in KaOS 2018.01

    KaOS 2018.01 is the latest release of KDE-focused Linux distro, KaoS Linux. This release features latest packages for the Plasma Desktop, includes Frameworks 5.42.0, Plasma 5.11.5, KDE Applications 17.12.1. All built on Qt 5.10.0. Also ships ships with an alternative desktop enviornment to KDE Plasma, called Liquidshell, which is a lightweight environment that’s still in development at the moment of writing.

    Powered by the latest Linux 4.14.14 kernel built with Retpoline support, Intel and AMD microcode firmware updates are also present. KaOS 2018.01 also ships with LLVM/Clang 5.0.1, Boost 1.66.0, ICU 60.2, Protobuf 3.5.1, Glib2 2.54.3, Libcdio 2.0.0, OpenCV 3.4.0, Ruby 2.5.0, and the Calamares graphical installer framework 3.2, which features experimental LVM support.

  • This week in Discover, part 9

    We need your help! Consider becoming a KDE contributor, and help make Discover the best Linux app store in existence!

  • Skrooge 2.12.0 released

    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.12.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

  • More comics management: making proper ACBF files.

    Krita 4.1’s comic project management tools now support 90% of all ACBF features.

  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Getting GTK Global Menu Support

    For those relying upon GTK applications like LibreOffice, GIMP, and GNOME programs from the KDE desktop, the integration is taking a step forward with Plasma 5.13.

  • GTK Global Menu

    For the past couple of weeks I have been working on a way to get GTK applications talk to Plasma’s Global Menu feature. I came up with a little helper application called gmenu-dbusmenu-proxy that talks both GMenu and DBusMenu protocols. This way no adjustment on Plasma’s side is needed, it just sees a regular global menu enabled application.

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Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon will open apps a lot faster

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  • Linux Foundation announces open source ACRN hypervisor for the Internet of Things
    ACRN's small footprint is partly attributable to the fact that it takes a mere 25,000 lines of code for a hypervisor. There's already involvement from the likes of ADLINK, Aptiv, Intel Corporation, LG Electronics and Neusoft Corporation, and it's likely that many more names will join this list.
  • Linux Foundation Announces ACRN —Open Source Hypervisor for IoT Devices
    The Linux Foundation announced a new project called ACRN (pronounced "acorn") that will provide generic code for the creation of hypervisors for IoT devices. A hypervisor is computer code for creating and running virtual machines. Project ACRN aims to provide a generic structure for an IoT-specific hypervisor component. The Linux Foundation says it built ACRN to be fully-customizable, and as such, the project is comprised of two main components: the hypervisor itself and a device model for interacting with the underlying hardware.
  • Linux Foundation backs new ‘ACRN’ hypervisor for embedded and IoT
    The Linux Foundation has announced a new hypervizor for use in embedded and internet of things scenarios. Project ACRN (pronounced “acorn”) will offer a “hypervizor, and its device model complete with rich I/O mediators.” There’ll also be “a Linux-based Service OS” and the ability to “run guest operating systems (another Linux instance, an RTOS, Android, or other operating systems) simultaneously”.