Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software: VLC 3.0 Review, The 10 Best Media Editing Applications for Linux, Public-Inbox

  • VLC 3.0 Vetinari review - The bleeding edge of goodness

    Vetinari is a pretty decent VLC release. One, it's the familiar product, and there are no surprises there, which is good from the user perspective. Two, unassumingly, you gain a whole load of new options and features, and they cover the bleeding edge of the media technology. Three, all of that for free, on any which device you want.

    My testing shows there are still some rough edges, and that the setup in Linux should be easier, and 360-deg playback in Windows more intuitive. But I also know things will quickly get better as these small bugs are ironed out. One thing that VLC has proven in the past fifteen years is that it's stable, robust, rich, and that it inexorably marches forward, into the storm of technology. Speaking of technology, VLC 3.0 grabs it by the horns and the balls. Perhaps 4K or 8K videos have no intrinsic value except to bleed your bandwidth and battery, but when it comes to fads, VLC has all the corners covered and then some, years ahead. It's a tech demonstrator and a clear, undisputed leader. Job well done. Time to watch some movies, then.

  • The 10 Best Media Editing Applications for Linux

    Are you a professional vlogger looking to improve the quality of your content? Or maybe you’re an aspiring director envisaging the next big picture with a photographer who wants to deliver photos that would make Annie Leibowitz (photographer) jealous.

    Our list today compiles media editing applications that are accessible to every Linux user who wants to excel at media editing. And although the regular user can take advantage of this list, most of the apps have a steep learning curve so be ready to get your hands dirty.

  • Creating an email archive with public-inbox

    Keeping up with the free-software development community requires following a lot of mailing lists. For many years, the Gmane email archive has helped your editor to do that without going any crazier than he already is, but Gmane is becoming an increasingly unreliable resource. A recent incident increased the priority of a longstanding goal to find (or create) an alternative to Gmane. That, in turn, led to the discovery of public-inbox.


    In mid-February, Gmane stopped receiving emails from every mailing list hosted at; those include most of the kernel-related lists, but also lists for other projects like Git. Your editor posted a query and learned that delivery problems had forced Gmane to be dropped from all lists hosted at vger. While this was happening, the main Gmane web page also ceased to work. Since then, a handful of vger lists have returned to Gmane, though the bulk of them remain unsubscribed.

    Those lists could certainly be fixed too, if somebody were to find the right person to poke. But the fact that so many high-profile lists could disappear for a week or more without anybody even seeming to notice makes it clear that Gmane is not getting a lot of attention these days. The wait for the web interface to come back is in vain; it's not at all clear that even what's there now is going to last for much longer.

    Gmane has served the community well for years; and we all owe the people who have worked to make that happen a huge round of thanks. But all things must end, and it may well be that Gmane's time is coming soon. So what is a frantic LWN editor to do to ensure his ability to keep up with the community?

More in Tux Machines

LuxMark OpenCL Performance On Windows vs. Linux With Radeon/NVIDIA

When carrying out this week's Windows vs. Linux gaming tests with AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce GPUs on the latest drivers, I also took the opportunity to run some fresh OpenCL benchmarks on Windows and Linux with the competing GPU vendors. I was particularly interested in running this test given the maturing state of ROCm on Linux for providing a new and modern compute stack... That coming with Linux 4.17+ will even begin to work from a mainline Linux kernel. Albeit for this round of testing was using AMD/GPUOpen's stock ROCm Ubuntu packages for 16.04 LTS as outlined on their GitHub page. Read more

Top Linux tools for writers

If you've read my article about how I switched to Linux, then you know that I’m a superuser. I also stated that I’m not an “expert” on anything. That’s still fair to say. But I have learned many helpful things over the last several years, and I'd like to pass these tips along to other new Linux users. Read more

i.MX6 ULL module runs Linux with real-time patch

Artila’s “M-X6ULL” COM runs Linux 4.14 with the PREEMPT_RT patch on an 800MHz i.MX6 ULL, and offers dual LAN controllers, 4GB eMMC or an optional microSD slot, and an optional carrier board. The M-X6ULL, which follows other Artila i.MX based modules such as the i.MX537 based M-5360A, measures only 68 x 43mm. Still, that’s hardly a record for modules featuring NXP’s Linux-driven, power-sipping i.MX6 ULL. MYIR’s MYC-Y6ULX measures 39 x 37mm. Read more

First Zynq UltraScale+ based 96Boards SBC runs PetaLinux

Avnet has launched its open-spec Ultra96 96Boards CE SBC for $249, featuring a Zynq UltraScale+ ARM/FPGA SoC, WiFi, BT, 4x USB, a mini-DisplayPort, and support for Linaro’s Avnet’s Ultra96 (AES-ULTRA96-G) was unveiled earlier this week as part of Linaro’s joint announcement of its program for unleashing the potential of artificial intelligence technology on selected Arm SoCs. Now this Zynq UltraScale+ based, 96Boards CE standard (85 x 54mm) SBC is available for pre-order at $249 with shipments starting in May. Read more