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Kodi 18 Leia Alpha

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Software
Movies
  • Kodi v18 Leia - Alpha 1

    A new hope dawns and it is finally time to start heading towards a final release. Today we are happy to announce that we are bringing you the first official pre-release Alpha build to a galaxy near you.

  • Kodi v18 Leia Alpha, BleachBit Version 2.0, Use an RPi 3 to Build Your Own Cheap Car Head Unit and More

    Kodi v18 Leia Alpha was released today with "more than 6140 (code chunks changed)", with great improvements to the HTPC software's music library, Live TV and video player. See the changelog for more details.

  • Kodi 18 "Leia" Enters Alpha With Thousands Of Changes

    Kodi, the popular HTPC software formerly known as XBMC, has put out the first alpha release of their upcoming 18 Leia milestone.

    Kodi 18 is a big update coming later in 2018 with RetroPlayer gaming support, Wayland support improvements, Google Assistant support, better live TV support, and much more. While there are new features, stability and usability improvements were also a main focus during Kodi 18 development.

More in Tux Machines

Brave browser switches to Chromium code base

  • Brave browser switches to Chromium code base for faster performance
    While Brave used Chromium’s back-end code since its inception in 2016, it used the Muon library for its UI. The company says that the new code base translates to a 22-percent performance improvement. It added that users should notice an 8-to-10-second gain on website load times, as compared to the previous version.
  • Brave browser switches base code to Chromium
    Brave browser has announced that it will fully switch to a Chromium base in its latest release, TheNextWeb reports. Brave used Chromium code since its inception in 2016, but used the Muon library for its UI. Brave joins the likes of Chrome, Edge, Opera, and Vivaldi to use Google’s open source Chromium as the base code for their browser. Version 0.57, the upcoming version that will use Chromium, will also support Chrome extensions and will categorise extensions as “allowed and vetted”, “allowed and unvetted”, and “blocked.”

Happy birthday, qutebrowser!

That's how qutebrowser looked a day after that (and that commit still seems to run!): https://imgur.com/a/xoG1r4G Exactly a year later, things were finally ready for a v0.1 release, after spending two weeks of holidays with fixing bugs. Originally, qutebrowser was born because the dwb project was discontinued: https://portix.bitbucket.io/dwb/ That's what I (and many others) were using at the time, and all alternatives were stuck with an unmaintained WebKit1. Since everything was using WebKitGTK which was horribly buggy (and WebKit2 in WebKitGTK lacked a lot of basic features), I decided to start my own thing, based on Qt instead. Back then, there were already discussions about QtWebEngine, and I originally wondered whether I should just wait with starting qutebrowser until it's ready. QtWebEngine support was finally added in July 2016, a lot later than I imagined. Initially, many features didn't work yet, but in September 2017 it finally became the default backend. Later, it turned out that qutebrowser also was a viable alternative for many Pentadactyl/Vimperator refugees, and qutebrowser got more popular than I ever imagined. Read more

This week in Usability & Productivity, part 49

There’s big news in Usability & Productivity: Firefox 64 can now use native KDE open/save dialogs! Read more

Android Leftovers