Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Vista 10 Adoption Too Low

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Windows 10 has had no overall growth in the last month. None

     

    This month's Netmarketshare figures are almost static, but are still worth a look. The very fact that they are so static will be frustrating, particularly for Microsoft, which is still desperately trying to find the carrot to bring businesses on to Windows 10.
     

    Unlike with Windows 8, which was just terrible for businesses, Windows 7 remains not broken and so there's no rush to fix it. Mild threats like Office 2019 not being available outside Windows 10, or withdrawing the old Skype client, are just not a big enough deal to a big enough group to get people invested in the switch.

  • Windows 10 Browser's Struggle Continues for Another Month

    Microsoft is betting big on Edge browser in Windows 10, and this is one of the reasons the company has become rather aggressive in its attempt to convince users to give it a try, but all these efforts seem to be failing due to the popularity of Google Chrome.

  • Is Microsoft Getting Ready to Kill Off Windows Media Player?

    Windows Media Player appears to be the next name on the list of features to be deprecated from Windows 10, as Microsoft has started pushing users to the Movies & TV UWP app that comes pre-installed on the operating system.

    A screenshot posted on reddit reveals that Microsoft is now showing popups to users launching Windows Media Player to highlight the capabilities of Movies & TV app, most likely in an attempt to migrate them to the new app in anticipation of a possible demise of the classic player.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Red Hat News

  • The future of Java and OpenJDK updates without Oracle support
    Oracle recently announced that it would no longer supply free (as in beer) binary downloads for JDK releases after a six-month period, and neither would Oracle engineers write patches for OpenJDK bugs after that period. This has caused a great deal of concern among some Java users. From my point of view, this is little more than business as usual. Several years ago, the OpenJDK 6 updates (jdk6u) project was relinquished by Oracle and I assumed leadership, and then the same happened with OpenJDK 7. Subsequently, Andrew Brygin of Azul took over the leadership of OpenJDK 6. The OpenJDK Vulnerability Group, with members from many organizations, collaborates on critical security issues. With the help of the wider OpenJDK community and my team at Red Hat, we have continued to provide updates for critical bugs and security vulnerabilities at regular intervals. I can see no reason why this process should not work in the same way for OpenJDK 8 and the next long-term support release, OpenJDK 11.
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: Deep Dive AIOps, Autoscaling and Scheduling on OpenShift with Jeremy Wei (Prophetstor)
    In this briefing, Prophetstor’s Jeremy Wei demonstrate using AIOps technologies to empower OpenShift scaler/scheduler to help ensure the operation of containers, and eliminate noisy neighbors by accurately predicting resource demand/ supply, performance and HW failure.
  • Istio on OpenShift: Technology Preview of Service Mesh Now Available
    We’re happy to announce the availability of our first technology preview of the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh, based on the Istio Project. The advancement of application/software development practices combined with technology/practice improvements in software delivery have resulted in a proliferation of application instances within many organizations. Whether these are macro/monoliths, “mini” services, or microservices, as the quantity of services increases, both the number and complexity of interactions increases. Until now much of the burden of managing these complex services interactions has been placed on the application developer. The evolution of sets of libraries like the Netflix Common Runtime Services & Libraries have brought many features and benefits for application resiliency, traffic control, etc. However, the use of these libraries is runtime-dependent (eg: Netflix’ libraries are Java-based) and they must be integrated into the application by the developer.
  • How open source game development hones valuable skills
    Two weeks ago I sat down with Michael Clayton and Jared Sprague to talk about Command Line Heroes: The Game. If you missed that post—have no fear—it is (of course) still available. But wait, why are we talking about games? In large part it’s because we’ve spent the last 12 months on the road asking people about their origin stories. And, after hundreds of interviews, we’ve come to understand that for many (but not all) their introduction to technology and/or computing started with video games. This inspired us to start Command Line Heroes season 2 with “Press Start,” an episode about how open source and video games share an origin story—one that takes place long before the terms “open source” and “internet” were even coined.
  • The Importance of a Nanosecond: Remembering Grace Hopper
    In the mid 1980s I was a young software engineer at Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). Admiral Grace Hopper in those days worked for Digital as a consultant, mostly a goodwill ambassador. Similar to Red Hat's annual Summit conference, Digital ran an event called DECUS. And it was paired with an internal event called, imaginatively enough, Internal DECUS. Having spent two weeks installing and configuring every software product that Digital made onto a very overloaded VAX 11/730, I was hovering on the Internal DECUS show floor making sure the demos didn't crash.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Stock Could Break Resistance and Hit $135.81
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Shares Bought by Stephens Investment Management Group LLC

CPod – A Simple, Beautiful And Cross-platform Podcast App

Podcasts have become very popular in the last few years. Podcasts are what’s called “infotainment”, they are generally light-hearted, but they generally give you valuable information. Podcasts have blown up in the last few years, and if you like something, chances are there is a podcast about it. There are a lot of podcast players out there for the Linux desktop, but if you want something that is visually beautiful, has slick animations, and works on every platform, there aren’t a lot of alternatives to CPod. CPod (formerly known as Cumulonimbus) is an open source and slickest podcast app that works on Linux, MacOS and Windows. CPod runs on something called Electron – a tool that allows developers to build cross-platform (E.g Windows, MacOs and Linux) desktop GUI applications. In this brief guide, we will be discussing – how to install and use CPod podcast app in Linux. Read more

today's howtos