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Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Released

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS released

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS
    (Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, as well
    as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support.

    Like previous LTS series', 16.04.4 includes hardware enablement stacks
    for use on newer hardware. This support is offered on all architectures
    except for 32-bit powerpc, and is installed by default when using one of
    the desktop images. Ubuntu Server defaults to installing the GA kernel,
    however you may select the HWE kernel from the installer bootloader.

    As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated
    installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to
    be downloaded after installation. These include security updates and
    corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining
    stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Officially Released, Here’s What’s New

    Canonical released today the fourth of fifth maintenance updates to its long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series with new kernel and graphics stacks.

    After it’s been delayed a couple of weeks due to the severe Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that affect billions of devices, Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS maintenance update is finally here for existing users running Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS and earlier versions.

    As expected, Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS incorporates refreshed kernel and graphics stacks based on those of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system. These include the Linux 4.13 kernel and Mesa 17.2.2 graphics stack for Intel and AMD GPUs.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Released, Makes Use Of Ubuntu 17.10's Kernel/Mesa Stack

    After being delayed due to Spectre and Meltdown with the Canonical developers busy mitigating those CPU security vulnerabilities, the Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS release was rolled out a few minutes ago.

    Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS is the latest installment to the Xenial Xerus and the last point release prior to this April's release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver." Ubuntu 16.04.4 offers a new hardware enablement stack of the Linux kernel, Mesa, and other components found within Ubuntu 17.10. This is particularly good news for updated open-source graphics driver support and performance along with the Linux 4.13-based kernel generally working better with more modern PCs.

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Using Menus For Command Line Programs and Scripts

THE holidays are coming (Christmas approaching), so I've taken advantage of some spare time to menu-ise commands that I use frequently. Those commands aren't the mere opening of an application and they often require dealing with input and output (in the command line). So I've created menu.sh and used dialog to craft the following menu, e.g. for operations associated with Techrights. I invoke this menu with the click of one button (of the mouse).

Rianne has a similar menu for commands she often runs (which are long and would otherwise need pasting or typing in length). Her menu looks something like this:

Rianne's menu

Here's the code (bash file) that renders the menu above (it's really that simple!):

#!/bin/bash

HEIGHT=15
WIDTH=40
CHOICE_HEIGHT=4
BACKTITLE="Aloha, Rianne"
TITLE="Rianne @ Ted"
MENU="Choose one of the following options:"

OPTIONS=(1 "Start VPN"
         2 "REDACTED"
         3 "REDACTED"
	4 "REDACTED"
	5 "REDACTED"
	6 "REDACTED"
	7 "REDACTED"
)

CHOICE=$(dialog --clear \
                --backtitle "$BACKTITLE" \
                --title "$TITLE" \
                --menu "$MENU" \
                $HEIGHT $WIDTH $CHOICE_HEIGHT \
                "${OPTIONS[@]}" \
                2>&1 >/dev/tty)

clear
case $CHOICE in
        1)
            echo "You chose Option 1"
sh ~/vpn.sh ;;

        2)
            echo "You chose Option 2"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        3)
            echo "You chose Option 3"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        4)
            echo "You chose Option 4"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        5)
            echo "You chose Option 5"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        6)
            echo "You chose Option 6"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        7)
            echo "You chose Option 7"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;

esac

Hopefully this inspires other people out there to do the same. It takes a while to set up, but it's a big time saver over the long run.

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