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Ten Things Linux Needs to Make it Bigger in Enterprise

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Linux


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Six Reasons Why Linux isn’t Mainstream yet

In brief,

#1 Installing Apps is a painful experience for the average Joe
#2 Sound Sharing is screwed up
# 3 Lack of device drivers, games and applications
#4 It is free. But so is a pirated copy of Windows.
#5 Where to Begin? How to Begin?
#6 No business model

Now, let’s go through the list. It is rather long. So, please be patient.

That Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: Linux and the Enterprise

#8 pretty much sums it up.

AD Integration.

If it can't be managed thru integration into the existing AD infrastructure, it will NEVER be approved by the CIO/CTO.

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Today in Techrights

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  • Google Summer of Code 2020 - Week 1

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  • [LibreOffice] How your donations helped us in 2019
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Servers: Kubernetes, Compression and Debian Activities

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    Kubernetes celebrates its sixth birthday on June 7: One of the fastest-growing open source projects ever, it’s driving significant change in enterprise IT, helping developers manage containers at scale. Moreover, it helps them develop applications faster and manage resources in automated ways. That’s important not only in DevOps and agile environments, but also in any enterprise IT environment pushing for faster software development and more experimentation. And any CIO or IT leader will tell you, the CEO’s biggest wish right now is faster response to customer needs and outside changes - most recently, a global pandemic. How much Kubernetes growth are we talking about? According to the CNCF Cloud Native Survey for 2019, 78 percent of respondents were using Kubernetes in production, up from 58 percent the previous year.

  • Russell Coker: Comparing Compression

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