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today's leftovers

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  • Is it an upgrade, or a sidegrade?

    I went to a nearby store, looked at the offers... And, in part due to the attitude of the salesguy, I decided not to (installing Linux will void any warranty, WTF‽ In 2018‽). Came back home, and... My Acer works again!

  • How To Install KDE Plasma Mobile On Your Android Smartphone?

    New Linux-based mobile operating systems and hardware projects have been making numerous headlines in the recent months. Projects like postmarketOS, Plasma Mobile, Librem 5, etc., have managed to gain momentum and support of open source community.

    To give you a rough idea of how things are going on the Plasma Mobile land, its developers have shared two methods (Via: Softpedia) to test Plasma Mobile on an actual Android smartphone. In a previous post, they also shared virtual machine images of the OS.

  • A KDE Love Story: Translating Kalzium into Chinese

    When I was a high school student, chemistry was not my cup of tea. My grades in chemistry were not bad either, but I hated memorizing those organic compounds. Then, I decided to major in computer science at university, and from that moment, destiny tightly bonded me and Free and Open Source Software.

  • Last week in Kube
  • fwupd now tells you about known issues

    That one little URL for the user to click on is the result of a rule engine being added to the LVFS. Of course, firmware updates shouldn’t ever fail, but in the real world they do, because distros don’t create /boot/efi correctly (cough, Arch Linux) or just because some people are running old versions of efivar, a broken git snapshot of libfwupdate or because a vendor firmware updater doesn’t work with secure boot turned on (urgh). Of all the failures logged on the LVFS, 95% fall into about 3 or 4 different failure causes, and if we know hundreds of people are hitting an issue we already understand we can provide them with some help.

  • I love free software… and Gentoo does! #ilovefs

    Some people care if software is free of cost or if it has the best features, above everything else. I don’t. I care that I can legally inspect its inner workings, modify and share modified versions. That’s why I happily avoid macOS, Windows, Skype, Photoshop.

  • Multiplexing Input or Output on a Raspberry Pi Part 1: Shift Registers

    A Raspberry Pi doesn't have that many GPIO pins, and neither does an Arduino Uno. An Arduino Mega does, but buying a Mega to go between the Pi and the keyboard kind of misses the point of scavenging a $3 keyboard; I might as well just buy an I2C or MIDI keyboard. So I needed some sort of I/O multiplexer that would let me read 31 keys using a lot fewer pins.

    There are a bunch of different approaches to multiplexing. A lot of keyboards use a matrix approach, but that makes more sense when you're wiring up all the buttons from scratch, not starting with a pre-wired keyboard like this. The two approaches I'll discuss here are shift registers and multiplexer chips.

  • Fanless, Linux-friendly Kaby Lake mini-tower drives seven 4K displays

    Compulab’s rugged “Airtop2” mini-tower runs Linux Mint or Win 10 on a Xeon E3-1275 or Core i7-7700 CPU with optional Nvidia Quadro P4000 graphics plus up to 64GB DDR4, a 6-drive NVMe/SATA subsystem, up to 7x display ports, and optional M.2 and FACE modules.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Dell Precision 'Developer Edition' mobile workstations run Ubuntu Linux and are RHEL certified

While Dell is mostly known as a Windows PC manufacturer, the company is also a big proponent of Linux. Its "Developer Edition" models can be configured with Ubuntu, for instance. Of course, despite this branding, non-developers can buy them too. The XPS 13 "Developer Edition" in particular is a svelte machine that should make many home Linux users very happy. In addition to home users, Dell manufactures solid business-class mobile workstations, and the company recently announced four such Linux-powered models. These Precision "Developer Edition" laptops run Ubuntu and are RHEL certified. One of these notebooks, the Precision 3530, is available today, while the other three will be available soon. Read more

Librem 13: A few problems

I bought my old Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon (1st gen.) when I entered grad school for my Master's program, in 2012. And after six years, the Thinkpad still ran well, but it was getting old, so I figured it was time for a change. I went back and forth about what kind of system should replace my laptop. I don't travel that much, so I figured a desktop would be better. And I could get a bigger screen. After going back and forth on the decision, I decided to get a laptop. I don't often travel with a laptop, but when I do, I prefer to use my primary system so I don't have to keep things synced. Of course, I wanted my system to run Linux. Purism is aimed at the Linux laptop market, and I wanted to support that. So I bought a Librem 13. I've had it now for about a week, and I love it now. But I'll be honest, I didn't love it right out of the box. I'd like to note two issues for folks who are thinking about getting a Librem laptop, so you aren't surprised like I was. Read more

Linux 4.17-rc7

So this week wasn't as calm as the previous weeks have been, but despite that I suspect this is the last rc. This week we had the whole "spectre v4" thing, and yes, the fallout from that shows up as part of the patch and commit log. But it's not actually dominant: the patch is pretty evenly one third arch updates, one third networking updates, and one third "rest". The arch updates are largely - although not exclusively - spectre v4. The networking stuff is mostly network drivers, but there's some core networking too. And "the rest" is just that - misc drivers (rdma, gpu, other), documentation, some vfs, vm, bpf, tooling.. The bulk of it is really pretty trivial one-liners, and nothing looks particularly scary. Let's see how next week looks, but if nothing really happens I suspect we can make do without an rc8. Shortlog appended as usual. Go out and test. Read more