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Qubes OS Security-Focused Operating System Now Supports Librem Linux Laptops

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OS
Security

Last year, Purism started shipping coreboot-enabled Librem laptops, and it received some interesting feedback from customers who bought them and attempted to install early release candidate images of the Qubes 4.0 operating system, reporting that the Qubes OS installer complained about IOMMU support.

Apparently, IOMMU support wasn't available in Intel's Skylake processors that powered Purism's Librem laptops, but it's supported by the coreboot firmware, formerly known as LinuxBIOS, so the company had to update its laptops to the latest coreboot release, which lets users install Qubes OS 4.0 without any warnings.

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