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Games: Farm Together and More on Rise of the Tomb Raider

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Jetson TX2, Gemini Lake, and Kaby Lake based mini-PCs run Linux

Cirrus7 unveiled an “AI-Box TX2” mini-PC with a Jetson TX2 module and -20 to 70°C support. The company also offers four, similarly Linux-friendly Kaby Lake-based mini-PCs and a new Gemini Lake model. Cirrus7 is a German manufacturer of Intel Core based mini-PCs that are available barebone or with pre-installed Ubuntu, Linux Mint, or Windows. Now the company has stepped into the Arm world with a mini-PC based on Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 module. Read more

Ubuntu News Leftovers

  • Canonical publishes user statistics that it collected during Ubuntu 18.04 LTS cycle
    Canonical has published the user statistics information that it collected during the first six months of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS cycle. The page was posted following the release of Ubuntu 18.10 yesterday and it reveals quite a lot of information about installations including computer details, the languages used, the country of the install and much more. With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Canonical began collecting information of users who decided to opt-in. According to the firm, 66% of users decided to do so. It found that clean installs made up 80% of the total installations, while upgrades made up for 20%. The firm also derived the location of Ubuntu users using the time zone and location options in the installer, rather than an identifiable IP address; surprisingly some of the countries Ubuntu was used a lot included Mexico, Brazil, Angola, Egypt, Afghanistan, South Korea, and Australia. They found English was the most popular language with 59%.
  • What’s Your Ubuntu 19.04 Codename Prediction?
    It’s that really fun part of the release cycle where we get you to try and guess the name of the next Ubuntu release! it could, at this point, be literally anything — but what do think the codename of Ubuntu 19.04 will be? Ten years on since Ubuntu 9.04 ‘Jaunty Jackalope’, the first release this site covered, plenty has changed. But so entrenched is that particular release that my muscle memory is still programmed to type 9.04 instead of 19.04 — so if you see a lot of errant 1s in future posts, you know why!
  • Canonical: Snaps Are Used Worldwide, over 3M Installs Monthly and 100K Daily
    To celebrate the release of the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system, Canonical published a new infographic to show us how well its Snap universal package format is doing lately. Entitled "Snaps in numbers," the new infographics focuses on how widely spread are Snaps, Canonical's universal binary format that makes it easier to distribute applications across multiple Linux-based operating systems. Initially called Snappy, the technology provides secure, rolling updates to your favorite apps. "Coinciding with the release of Ubuntu 18.10 today, we have celebrated the exceptional adoption of snaps by sharing the infographic below," said Canonical. "From popular snaps to daily installs, this infographic demonstrates where, when and why users are installing and adopting the secure, Linux application format."
  • Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish Linux Release
    The Ubuntu 18.10 Linux release became generally available on Oct 18, providing new capabilities for desktop, server and cloud users. On the desktop there is a new theme called "Yaru" that provides a different look and feel than what was provided by default in the prior 18.04 LTS release. Unlike 18.04, the 18.10 update is not a Long Term Support (LTS) release and will not get five years of support, instead it will only have nine months of support. On the server side, Ubuntu 18.10 benefits from an updated Linux 4.18 kernel as well as support for TLS 1.3 encryption. The Ubuntu Server 18.10 integrated the OpenStack Rocky release, providing users with a stable version of the most recent open source OpenStack cloud platform release.
  • Welcome Ubuntu Desktop 18.10
    The Cosmic Cuttlefish has arrived. Ubuntu 18.10 is out and represents the first step on the road to the next LTS in April 2020. This release of Ubuntu comes with 9 months of support and brings the latest update to the GNOME stack, improvements to the snap experience on the desktop, some new features and usability improvements, and a fresh new theme developed by the awesome Yaru developer community.
  • Ubuntu events in November
    November is just around the corner, winter jumpers are being dug out from the back of the wardrobe and it’s now acceptable to put the heating on. Although many may be considering hibernation, the Ubuntu team here at Canonical will be out and about around the world at a number of big events. So if you want to know where you can catch up with the Ubuntu team at Canonical and learn about the latest developments then you can find us here:
  • Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Has Been Released and More Linux News
  • Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Has Been Released | Download
    The latest stable release Ubuntu 18.10 with a code name (Cosmic Cuttlefish) has been released. Ubuntu 18.10 comes with 7 different flavours, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu Mate, Ubuntu Studio, Xubuntu, and the main release Ubuntu with Gnome desktop environment.
  • SD Times news digest: Datalore 1.0, MIT’s smarter homes, and Ubuntu 18.10
    Ubuntu 18.10 has been released, and has several updates that make it optimized for multi-cloud deployments and AI software development. It features a new community desktop theme, adding fingerprint unlock functionality for compatible PCs. It also has a richer snap desktop integration, and now allows native desktop control to access files on the host system.

Ubuntu-Based Distros on Devices: GPD and System76

  • There’s an official Ubuntu MATE 18.10 build for GPD Pocket devices
    Canonical released Ubuntu 18.10 this week. But Ubuntu isn’t just a single operating system: there are also a bunch of official and unofficial flavors. So this week we also got Kubuntu 18.10, Lubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu MATE 18.10, and Ubuntu Budgie 18.10, just to name a few. They include core Ubuntu updates plus a group of additional changes that are specific to the desktop environment and apps used by each of these projects.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 released with new desktop theme
    Canonical released a new version of the organization's Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution; Ubuntu 18.10, called Cosmic Cuttlefish, comes with a new community desktop theme, improved snap desktop integration, multi-cloud computing optimizations and other improvements. Ubuntu 18.10 will be supported for nine months; organizations and users who require long term support should stay with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS instead which is supported for five years.
  • GPD Pocket devices get special Ubuntu MATE 18.10 Linux image
    Just yesterday, Ubuntu 18.10 was released. "Cosmic Cuttlefish," as the operating system is called, is available in several flavors featuring various desktop environments other than the stock GNOME -- Xfce (Xbuntu), KDE (Kubuntu), and more.
  • See what changes have been orbiting Pop!_OS!
    Your favorite Pop!_erating system has leveled up with Pop!_18.10. Most of the new updates will also be rolled into Pop!_18.04. Here’s what we’ve been working on since our last Pop!_OS announcement: New kernel, graphic stack, and GNOME desktop environment for Pop!_18.10
  • System76 Pop!_OS Updated Against Ubuntu 18.10, Adds In Extra Changes
    In addition to System76 being busy finishing up work on their new PC build factory in Denver and making their first foray into open-source hardware, they also continue working on Pop!_OS as their downstream of Ubuntu Linux with various features added in. While System76 has been shipping Ubuntu-loaded laptops and desktops for more than a decade, they have been trying to differentiate themselves on the hardware and software front. The Pop!_OS effort has come a long way over the past year and out now is their 18.10 release based upon the newly-minuted Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish.

Kickstarting the Makerphone: an open-source hardware phone kit, programmable with python and Scratch

Circuitmess's fully funded Makerphone kickstarter is raising money to produce open source hardware smartphone kits to teach kids (and grownups) everything from soldering to programming. The Makerphone is a pretty sweet-looking gadget, and it comes ready to be programmed with Scratch and python, providing a good progression from a fully graphic programming environment to a command-line language that's still beginner-friendly. $94 gets you a kit and the tools to assemble it; $99 gets you an assembled phone. The project's runners have previously delivered on kickstarted open source hardware kits, which bodes well for getting something for your money. Read more