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Kernel: NSA Code/Algorithm in Linux, Performance Superiority Over Windows, and Linux Foundation News

  • Linux 4.18 brings support for Vega M, Volta GV100 and, er, SPECK
    AFTER A WEEK'S DELAY, Linux kernel 4.18 stable has arrived. Announcing the release on Sunday, head of Linuxing Linus Torvalds said: "One week late(r) and here we are - 4.18 is out there. It was a very calm week, and arguably I could just have released on schedule last week, but we did have some minor updates." One notable change is that there's been a lot of code ditched - around 100,000 lines of obsolete code has been slashed.
  • The AMD Threadripper 2990WX shows even higher numbers when benchmarked on Linux
    Phoronix has done a performance comparison of the AMD Threadripper 2990WX in Windows 10 Pro and Linux and the results show Threadripper numbers significantly lower under Windows 10 Pro than in Linux. In some tests such as 7-Zip Compression, the Threadripper 2990WX posted almost 58% higher scores in Linux compared to Windows 10 Pro implying that Linux is a better OS of choice when testing high core count CPUs.
  • Diversity Empowerment Summit Highlights Importance of Allies
    Diversity and inclusion are hot topics as projects compete to attract more talent to power development efforts now as well as build their ranks to carry the projects into the future. The Diversity Empowerment Summit co-located with Open Source Summit coming up in Vancouver August 29-31, will offer key insights to help your project succeed in these endeavors. Although adoption of diversity and inclusion policies is generally seen as simply the right thing to do, finding good paths to building and implementing such policies within existing community cultures continues to be challenging. The Diversity Empowerment Summit, however, provides hard insights, new ideas, and proven examples to help open source professionals navigate this journey.
  • Hollywood rolls out red carpet for open source developers
    The launch of the ASWF is almost like creating a GitHub for the developers behind motion pictures, but open source is nothing new to the film industry. It dates back about 20 years, Andy Maltz, managing director of the Science and Technology Council at the Academy, told CIO Dive. Film "is the only art form that has a fundamental reliance on technology," he said. The film industry's use of tech dates back to photochemical technologies and proceeds to today's digital image capture.

Microsoft Openwashing and Infiltration Tactics

Debian GNU/Linux project to mark 25th birthday on Thursday

The Debian GNU/Linux project will turn 25 on Thursday, with the Linux distribution having made its debut on 16 August in 1993 under the leadership of the late Ian Murdock. In its original manifesto, Murdock stated: "Many distributions have started out as fairly good systems, but as time passes attention to maintaining the distribution becomes a secondary concern." Maintaining a Debian system was made simple after some developers created a package management system known as apt. Apt — and its derivatives like aptitude and synaptic — have served to make the task of updating a Debian system simple. With apt, the secondary concern that Murdock referred to was effectively taken care of. Incidentally, there are now about 29,000 packages available in Debian. Read more Also new (Debian-related news):

  • DebConf 18
  • Google Summer of Code 2018- Final Report
    This project aims at developing tools and packages which would simplify the process for new applicants in the open source community to get the required setup. It would consist of a GUI/Wizard with integrated scripts to setup various communication and development tools like PGP and SSH key, DNS, IRC, XMPP, mail filters along with Jekyll blog creation, mailing lists subscription, project planner, searching for developer meet-ups, source code scanner and much more! The project would be free and open source hosted on Salsa (Debian based Gitlab) I created various scripts and packages for automating tasks and helping a user get started by managing contacts, emails, subscribe to developer’s lists, getting started with Github, IRC and more.

Graphics: Libinput 1.12 RC2, xf86-video-v4l v0.3.0, Intel DRM Driver and RADV Vulkan Driver

  • [ANNOUNCE] libinput 1.11.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.12 is now available. First a heads-up, this is probably going to be a longer RC cycle than usual, just look at the commit count for rc1..rc2 below. I don't have any additional large features planned for 1.12, so the rest should just be bugfixing and polishing now.
  • Libinput 1.12 RC2 Continues Working On Improving Linux Touchpad Behavior
    We've known libinput 1.12 is going to be a significant release and that's still holding true in looking at the second release candidate for this Wayland/X.Org input handling library. Libinput 1.12 RC1 was working on replacing its udev "hwdb" hardware database with its own quirk handling system, migrating documentation from Sphinx to ReadTheDocs, FreeBSD support, improved trackpoint code, various touchpad fixes and improvements, and other input handling tweaks.
  • xf86-video-v4l X.Org Driver Sees First New Release In A Decade
    The xf86-video-v4l v0.3.0 driver was announced today as the first new release for this DDX driver in ten years. In case you don't have any recollection of this DDX driver, this "Video 4 Linux adapter driver" is used for registering generic X-Video (Xv) adapters that can be used in turn by any graphics driver.
  • Intel Publishes New DRM Driver For Their Arria 10 FPGA System
    An Intel engineer has published the "Intel FPGA Video and Image Processing Suite" DRM driver today for Linux. This Direct Rendering Manager is intended for use with their Arria 10 FPGA system when combined with Intel DisplayPort IP.
  • RADV Now Supports On-Demand Compilation Of Built-In Shaders
    For helping out the RADV Vulkan driver in cases where no shader cache is available, this open-source Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver now supports the on-demand compilation of built-in shaders. On cases like Android, ChromeOS, or sandboxes where no on-disk shader cache is available due to write/security permissions, RADV can take a while to start-up for some programs due to having to compile all of the built-in pipelines at start. RADV co-founder Bas Nieuwenhuizen says this process can take one to four seconds for the creation of a device.