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Red Hat and VMware make a bundle

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Linux

'Red Hat has a friend after all.

The Linux maker this week announced a bundling exercise with server virtualization specialist VMware. The companies' deal will see them pair Red Hat's version of the Linux operating system with VMware's flagship server slicing product. The upshot of the agreement – and it’s a minor one – is that Red Hat and VMware are now a bit closer partners.

"With this relationship, the two virtualization platforms that Red Hat Enterprise Linux will support are the VMware platform and the Red Hat Integrated Virtualization platform that will be available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5," said Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens.

Full Story.


Also:

Oracle, with its recent claims to be able to support Red Hat Enterprise Linux under the name Unbreakable Linux better than Red Hat does, has a hard road ahead of it. Behind Red Hat's support network is a large, well-trained organization.

Iain Gray, Red Hats senior director of global support, explained that Red Hat offers 24x7 support around the world using a "follow the sun model." By this, he means that Red Hat maintains technical support centers around the world.

The company's primary technical support centers are in Raleigh NC, Brisbane Australia, Guildford England, and Pune India. In each of these main centers, support up to and including level 3 is supplied. All together, Red Hat has support centers in twelve countries with help available in eleven different languages.

So, Red Hat's follow the sun support works like this.

How Red Hat does support

Oracle must eat Red Hat or fork, says Ubuntu man

Oracle's decision to trigger a Linux turf war has thus far produced the exact results Larry Ellison desired. Red Hat investors freaked out, and Red Hat customers gained a new avenue for putting pricing pressure on their Linux supplier. Despite such concrete turns in the Linux market, Oracle's support plan continues to be more bluster than muster, according to Mark Shuttleworth, whose company Canonical oversees Ubuntu Linux.

Good old young Larry will give up on the marketing machinations and buy Red Hat once he discovers that maintaining a Linux fork is too damn hard, space cadet Shuttleworth tells us.

"I think it's great that Oracle has entered the Linux market, but the specific tactic they have chosen is going to be very impractical," Shuttleworth said, in an interview with The Register at Google's headquarters. "It is really hard to maintain a fork of a binary platform.

"Larry Ellison was basically saying that Oracle will keep Red Hat Linux the same but then also make it better. The end result of that will be death by a thousands paper cuts. There will be lots and lots of little incompatibilities.

That Story.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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