Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 4.16 Now in Release Candidate Mode

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.16-rc1

    Two weeks have passed, -rc1 is out there, and the merge window is thus over.

    I don't want to jinx anything, but things certainly look a lot better
    than with 4.15. We have no (known) nasty surprises pending, and there
    were no huge issues during the merge window. Fingers crossed that this
    stays fairly calm and sane.

    As usual, I'm only appending my mergelog, because while this is not
    shaping up to be a particularly huge release, none of our recent
    releases have been small enough to describe with the shortlogs I use
    for later rc's.

    The actual diff is dominated by drivers, and once again the GPU
    patches stand out - this time some AMD GPU header files. Happily, this
    time the bulk of those lines is actually *removal* due to cleanups and
    getting rid of some unused headers.

    But there really is changes all over. Drivers may be the bulk (GPU,
    networking, staging, media, sound, infiniband, scsi and misc smaller
    subsystems), but we have a fair amount of arch updates (spectre and
    meltdown fixes for non-x86 architectures, but also some further x86
    work, and just general arch updates). And there's networking,
    filesystem updates, documentation, tooling..

    There's a little bit for everybody, in other words.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linux 4.16-rc1 Kernel Released With Many Changes

    Just like clockwork, the first release candidate of Linux 4.16 is now available.

    Linux 4.16-rc1 was tagged just minutes ago and remains under the "Fearless Coyote" codename that has been happening for several cycles now. Over the Linux v4.15 stable release, the Linux 4.16 merge window up to RC1 brings 11340 files changed, 491295 insertions(+), 305085 deletions(-). Yes, that's another hearty merge window.

    To learn about all of the changes for this next kernel version, see my thorough Linux 4.16 feature overview that I finished up this morning. Linux 4.16 is bringing a lot more work on Spectre/Meltdown mitigation, AMDGPU DC multi-display synchronization, better Intel Cannonlake support, VirtualBox Guest Driver is now mainline, many CPU/scalability improvements, AMD SEV encrypted virtualization support for KVM, file-system improvements, new ARM board support, and a wide range of other improvements as outlined in the aforelinked article.

  • A Look At The Plethora Of Linux 4.16 Kernel Features & Changes

    After the lengthy Linux 4.15 kernel cycle, the past two weeks have marked the Linux 4.16 merge window. Yet again it's been another heavy feature period for the kernel. There is still a lot of mitigation work going on for most CPU architectures surrounding Spectre and also Meltdown, the open-source graphics drivers have continued getting better, various CPU improvements are present, the VirtualBox Guest driver was mainlined, and dozens of other notable changes for Linux 4.16. Take a look.

    Here's our usual kernel feature overview from our original reporting the past two weeks in closely monitoring the Linux kernel mailing list and Git repository. Linus Torvalds is expected to mark the end of the merge window today by releasing Linux 4.16-rc1.

More in Tux Machines

Happy birthday, GNOME: 8 reasons to love this Linux desktop

GNOME has been my favorite desktop environment for quite some time. While I always make it a point to check out other environments from time to time, there are some aspects of the GNOME desktop that are hard to live without. While there are many great desktop environments out there, GNOME feels like home to me. Here are some of the features I enjoy most about GNOME. Read more

Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

The Amiga community remains one of the most passionate and inventive we have ever seen, even now, decades after Commodore’s demise. A couple of weeks back, we featured just a few recent projects that were designed to breathe new life into aging Amiga systems, or at the very least ensure they remain repairable for the foreseeable future. Our article explaining how to build a cheap Amiga emulator using a Raspberry Pi was immensely popular as well. Today, however, we stumbled across a video that encapsulates the ingenuity of many of the more technical folks in the Amiga community. What it shows is an Amiga 3000UX, equipped with a Voodoo 3 card and BigFoot Networks Killer NIC M1, running some software – including Quake – on the Killer NIC’s on-board Power PC processor. Read more

New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power
    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”
  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4
    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion. Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

'Foreshadow' Coverage