Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Flickergate: Users Put Surface Pro in Freezer to Fix Issue Microsoft Ignores

    A screen flickering issue impacting Microsoft’s Surface Pro is pushing owners to some extreme workarounds, including putting their devices in freezers.

    As weird as this may sound, this solution solves the problem temporarily, removing the flickering completely and returning the display to normal.

    A group of Surface Pro owners launched a website called “Flickergate” to explain the issue in detail and to emphasize that Microsoft has until now ignored all reports despite hundreds of post being published on its very own forums. One such thread on Microsoft Community has no less than 140 pages of users complaining about the issue since early 2017.

  • Containers from user space

    In a linux.conf.au 2018 keynote called "Containers from user space" [...]

    Frazelle started by noting that she has recently moved to Microsoft — "selling out has been amazing"...

  • Too many lords, not enough stewards

    For anyone who has followed Daniel Vetter's talks over the last year or two, it is fairly clear that he is not happy with the kernel development process and the role played by kernel maintainers. In a strongly worded talk at linux.conf.au (LCA) 2018 in Sydney, he further explored the topic (that he also raised at LCA 2017) in a talk entitled "Burning down the castle". In his view, kernel development is broken and it is unlikely to improve anytime soon.

    He started by noting that this talk would be a "rather more personal talk than others I give". It is his journey from first looking in on the kernel in high school to learn how operating systems work. The kernel developers were his heroes who created this awesome operating system by discussing things out in the open.

    Eventually he started scratching his own itch in the graphics subsystem, which led to him getting hired to work on Linux graphics professionally on a small team. He got volunteered to be the kernel maintainer for that team, which grew from three to twenty people in a year or two. In that time he learned the tough lesson that "leading teams is leading people". But he has learned that the way kernel maintainers work is making developers unhappy, including him. The talk would be a look at how he learned just how broken things are.

  • Media Subsystem Changes Head Into Linux 4.16: NVIDIA Tegra Decoder, Xbox One TV Tuner

    While the Linux 4.16 merge window is nearing the end of the line, there still are some feature updates still being sent in, including a big batch of media subsystem changes sent in on Tuesday.

  • RadeonSI VCN Encode Now Supports HEVC Main

    More video acceleration related commits landed in the Mesa 18.1-dev Git tree this week.

    The code that was merged on Monday by AMD's Boyuan Zhang allows for HEVC/H.265 GPU-accelerated video encoding when using the VCN block. The "Video Core Next" hardware is initially just found on Raven Ridge APUs but almost certainly coming to next-generation discrete GPUs.

  • How to set up LXD on Civo (new UK VPS provider)
  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 17.1.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 17.1.0 for both macOS and Linux. CrossOver 17.1.0 has many improvements to the core Windows compatibility layer and also specific enhancements for several popular applications.

  • Quarter Window Tiling Support added to the MATE Desktop

    Support for quarter window tiling has been added to the MATE desktop. The feature is one of several improvements shipping in the latest stable release of the ‘retrospective’ desktop environment, which was forked from GNOME 2 back in 2011. Specifically its MATE’s window manager Marco that’s been gifted support for ‘quadrant window tiling’.

  • MATE 1.20 Released With HiDPI Abilities, Global Menu Support

    After nearly one year in development, lead MATE developer Martin Wimpress has announced version 1.20 of this GNOME2-forked desktop environment.

  • Updates on the Endless App Center / GNOME Software

    The great majority of my work at Endless is to (try to) tame GNOME Software and apply the changes that make it what we simply call “the App Center” (repo here) in the Endless OS.
    This is a lot of work and usually I’d love to share more often what I am doing but end up neglecting the blog due to the lack of time. So here’s a summary of what I have done the past few months.

  • Manjaro XFCE Linux Review – For The Record

    Manjaro XFCE Linux Review. Today I take a look at Manjaro XFCE and I must say, there’s a lot to like about it. I also share some tidbits that I like about this release in addition to some issues I didn’t quite understand as well.

  • Kali Linux 2018.1 Released For Ethical Hackers — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

    In 2016, Offensive Security–the developer of Kali Linux ethical hacking distro–decided to switch to a rolling release model. However, from time to time, they keep releasing the Kali snapshots with all the latest patches, fixes, and updates. Following the same tradition, the developers have pushed the first snapshot for 2018.

  • OSMC's January update is here

    OSMC's January update is ready with a wide range of improvements and fixes to keep your OSMC device running in tip-top shape.

  • ASU student named finalist for Red Hat’s 'Women in Open Source' award

    When a teenaged Nikki Stevens built her first website, she did not foresee the barriers she would encounter in pursuit of her newfound passion. Now a doctoral candidate with Arizona State University's School for the Future of Innovation in Society, she has founded two organizations, works a lucrative career as a technical architect and freelance software engineer and has been selected as a finalist for Red Hat’s “Women in Open Source Award.”

  • Investor Watch: Looking at the Numbers for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 06 February 2018

    Below is a summary of uploads to the development and supported releases.

  • LXD weekly status #33
  •  

  • Deal Alert! Get exclusive offers on Samsung wearables this Valentine

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested
    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.
  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?
    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises. For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery. Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time. Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.

OSS Leftovers

  • Haiku: R1/beta1 release plans - at last
    At last, R1/beta1 is nearly upon us. As I’ve already explained on the mailing list, only two non-“task” issues remain in the beta1 milestone, and I have prototype solutions for both. The buildbot and other major services have been rehabilitated and will need only minor tweaking to handle the new branch, and mmlr has been massaging the HaikuPorter buildmaster so that it, too, can handle the new branch, though that work is not quite finished yet.
  • Haiku OS R1 Beta Is Finally Happening In September
    It's been five years since the last Haiku OS alpha release for their inaugural "R1" release but next month it looks like this first beta will be released, sixteen years after this BeOS-inspired open-source operating system started development.
  • IBM Scores More POWER Open-Source Performance Optimizations
    Following our POWER9 Linux benchmarks earlier this year, IBM POWER engineers have continued exploring various areas for optimization within the interesting open-source workloads tested. Another batch of optimizations are pending for various projects.
  • DevConf.in 2018
    Earlier this month, I attended DevConf.in 2018 conference in Bengaluru, KA, India. It was sort of culmination of a cohesive team play that began for me at DevConf.cz 2018 in Brno, CZ. I say sort of because the team is already gearing up for DevConf.in 2019.
  • The Unitary Fund: a no-strings attached grant program for Open Source quantum computing
    Quantum computing has the potential to be a revolutionary technology. From the first applications in cryptography and database search to more modern quantum applications across simulation, optimization, and machine learning. This promise has led industrial, government, and academic efforts in quantum computing to grow globally. Posted jobs in the field have grown 6 fold in the last two years. Quantum computing hardware and platforms, designed by startups and tech giants alike, continue to improve. Now there are new opportunities to discover how to best program and use these new machines. As I wrote last year: the first quantum computers will need smart software. Quantum computing also remains a place where small teams and open research projects can make a big difference. The open nature is important as Open Source software has the lowest barriers  for others to understand, share and build upon existing projects. In a new field that needs to grow, this rapid sharing and development is especially important. I’ve experienced this myself through leading the Open Source Forest project at Rigetti Computing and also by watching the growing ecosystem of open projects like QISKit, OpenFermion, ProjectQ, Strawberry Fields, XaCC, Cirq, and many others. The hackathons and community efforts from around the world are inspiring.
  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology.