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today's leftovers

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  • Flickergate: Users Put Surface Pro in Freezer to Fix Issue Microsoft Ignores

    A screen flickering issue impacting Microsoft’s Surface Pro is pushing owners to some extreme workarounds, including putting their devices in freezers.

    As weird as this may sound, this solution solves the problem temporarily, removing the flickering completely and returning the display to normal.

    A group of Surface Pro owners launched a website called “Flickergate” to explain the issue in detail and to emphasize that Microsoft has until now ignored all reports despite hundreds of post being published on its very own forums. One such thread on Microsoft Community has no less than 140 pages of users complaining about the issue since early 2017.

  • Containers from user space

    In a linux.conf.au 2018 keynote called "Containers from user space" [...]

    Frazelle started by noting that she has recently moved to Microsoft — "selling out has been amazing"...

  • Too many lords, not enough stewards

    For anyone who has followed Daniel Vetter's talks over the last year or two, it is fairly clear that he is not happy with the kernel development process and the role played by kernel maintainers. In a strongly worded talk at linux.conf.au (LCA) 2018 in Sydney, he further explored the topic (that he also raised at LCA 2017) in a talk entitled "Burning down the castle". In his view, kernel development is broken and it is unlikely to improve anytime soon.

    He started by noting that this talk would be a "rather more personal talk than others I give". It is his journey from first looking in on the kernel in high school to learn how operating systems work. The kernel developers were his heroes who created this awesome operating system by discussing things out in the open.

    Eventually he started scratching his own itch in the graphics subsystem, which led to him getting hired to work on Linux graphics professionally on a small team. He got volunteered to be the kernel maintainer for that team, which grew from three to twenty people in a year or two. In that time he learned the tough lesson that "leading teams is leading people". But he has learned that the way kernel maintainers work is making developers unhappy, including him. The talk would be a look at how he learned just how broken things are.

  • Media Subsystem Changes Head Into Linux 4.16: NVIDIA Tegra Decoder, Xbox One TV Tuner

    While the Linux 4.16 merge window is nearing the end of the line, there still are some feature updates still being sent in, including a big batch of media subsystem changes sent in on Tuesday.

  • RadeonSI VCN Encode Now Supports HEVC Main

    More video acceleration related commits landed in the Mesa 18.1-dev Git tree this week.

    The code that was merged on Monday by AMD's Boyuan Zhang allows for HEVC/H.265 GPU-accelerated video encoding when using the VCN block. The "Video Core Next" hardware is initially just found on Raven Ridge APUs but almost certainly coming to next-generation discrete GPUs.

  • How to set up LXD on Civo (new UK VPS provider)
  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 17.1.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 17.1.0 for both macOS and Linux. CrossOver 17.1.0 has many improvements to the core Windows compatibility layer and also specific enhancements for several popular applications.

  • Quarter Window Tiling Support added to the MATE Desktop

    Support for quarter window tiling has been added to the MATE desktop. The feature is one of several improvements shipping in the latest stable release of the ‘retrospective’ desktop environment, which was forked from GNOME 2 back in 2011. Specifically its MATE’s window manager Marco that’s been gifted support for ‘quadrant window tiling’.

  • MATE 1.20 Released With HiDPI Abilities, Global Menu Support

    After nearly one year in development, lead MATE developer Martin Wimpress has announced version 1.20 of this GNOME2-forked desktop environment.

  • Updates on the Endless App Center / GNOME Software

    The great majority of my work at Endless is to (try to) tame GNOME Software and apply the changes that make it what we simply call “the App Center” (repo here) in the Endless OS.
    This is a lot of work and usually I’d love to share more often what I am doing but end up neglecting the blog due to the lack of time. So here’s a summary of what I have done the past few months.

  • Manjaro XFCE Linux Review – For The Record

    Manjaro XFCE Linux Review. Today I take a look at Manjaro XFCE and I must say, there’s a lot to like about it. I also share some tidbits that I like about this release in addition to some issues I didn’t quite understand as well.

  • Kali Linux 2018.1 Released For Ethical Hackers — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

    In 2016, Offensive Security–the developer of Kali Linux ethical hacking distro–decided to switch to a rolling release model. However, from time to time, they keep releasing the Kali snapshots with all the latest patches, fixes, and updates. Following the same tradition, the developers have pushed the first snapshot for 2018.

  • OSMC's January update is here

    OSMC's January update is ready with a wide range of improvements and fixes to keep your OSMC device running in tip-top shape.

  • ASU student named finalist for Red Hat’s 'Women in Open Source' award

    When a teenaged Nikki Stevens built her first website, she did not foresee the barriers she would encounter in pursuit of her newfound passion. Now a doctoral candidate with Arizona State University's School for the Future of Innovation in Society, she has founded two organizations, works a lucrative career as a technical architect and freelance software engineer and has been selected as a finalist for Red Hat’s “Women in Open Source Award.”

  • Investor Watch: Looking at the Numbers for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 06 February 2018

    Below is a summary of uploads to the development and supported releases.

  • LXD weekly status #33
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  • Deal Alert! Get exclusive offers on Samsung wearables this Valentine

More in Tux Machines

Slovak advocates want parliament to push for open source

Slovak proponents of the use of free and open source software are rallying for their country’s parliament to approve plans to share the source code of software solutions developed by and for public services. They are concerned that proprietary software vendors will lobby for changes to the eGovernment act, a strategic IT Government proposal that is to be discussed in parliament in March or April. Read more

Intel Graphics: Discrete Graphics Cards and SVT-AV1

  • Intel Preps For Discrete Graphics Cards With Linux Patches
    Intel has confirmed that recent patches to its Linux graphics driver were related to its continued work on preparing the ecosystem for its new line of discrete graphics cards. Phoronix reported that Intel released 42 such patches with more than 4,000 lines of code between them on February 14. The main purpose of the patches was to introduce the concept of memory regions in "preparation for upcoming devices with device local memory." (Such as, you know, discrete graphics cards.) [...] Still, any information about Intel's graphics plans is welcome. Right now the graphics market is dominated by AMD and Nvidia, and as we noted in December, Intel is probably the only company that even has a possibility of successfully introducing a new discrete graphics architecture. Why not enjoy the occasional glimpse behind the curtain as that architecture's being built?
  • SVT-VP9 Is Intel's Latest Open-Source Video Encoder Yielding High Performance VP9
    At the start of the month Intel open-sourced SVT-AV1 aiming for high-performance AV1 video encoding on CPUs. That complemented their existing SVT-HEVC encoder for H.265 content and already SVT-AV1 has been seeing nice performance improvements. Intel now has released SVT-VP9 as a speedy open-source VP9 video encoder. Uploaded on Friday was the initial public open-source commit of SVT-VP9, the Intel Scalable Video Technology VP9 encoder. With this encoder they are focusing on being able to provide real-time encoding of up to two 4Kp60 streams on an Intel Xeon Gold 6140 processor. SVT-VP9 is under a BSD-style license and currently runs on Windows and Linux.

How I got my job in Linux: from Newbie to Pro

I was peeved, because I’d spent my own money on building a computer and buying Microsoft Windows to put on it. Money that I really needed to pay the rent and put food in my belly. I also felt sorry for all the people that I’d end up re-installing Windows on their PC to fix their problem. I knew that most of them would probably be back in the store six or so months later with the same complaint. Almost by accident, I found Linux. I was in the magazine section of the PC shop I worked in one day in late 1999. I saw a magazine called ‘Linux Answers’. On the cover was a copy of Red Hat Linux 6.0. Before long, I had done the unthinkable: I had deleted Windows in a rage of fury because it had completely crashed and wouldn’t start up. All of my MP3s, photos and documents, all but gone save for a few backups on CDs I had lying around. Back in those days I had no idea that I would have been able to salvage those files with Linux; I just blithely reformatted my hard disk and went cold-turkey, believing everything that the magazine said, I forced myself into the abyss of the unknown! These were exciting times! I remember the blue text-mode installer, the glare of the many lines of text flying by when the machine started up for the first time. It looked really un-user friendly. Eventually, the screen flipped into what I’d later know to be called ‘runlevel 5’ and I could see a graphical login screen. Little did I know it, but that flashing cursor was the beginning to a whole new world of computing for me. Read more

Linux 5.0-rc7

A nice and calm week, with statistics looking normal. Just under half drivers (gpu, networking, input, md, block, sound, ...), with the rest being architecture fixes (arm64, arm, x86, kvm), networking and misc (filesystem etc). Nothing particularly odd stands out, and everything is pretty small. Just the way I like it. Shortlog appended, Linus Read more