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Devices: Project Things and More

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Linux
  • Mozilla Announces Project Things, ZFS Version 0.7.6, Kali Linux New Release and More

    Mozilla announced Project Things yesterday, "an open framework for connecting your devices to the web". According to the Mozilla Blog, "We kicked off 'Project Things', with the goal of building a decentralized 'Internet of Things' that is focused on security, privacy, and interoperability."

  • Lars and the Real Internet of Things - Part 1

    First, though, my history with home automation:

    When I was a teenager in the 1970s, I had an analog alarm clock with an electrical outlet on the back labeled "coffee". About ten minutes before the alarm would go off, it would turn on the power to the outlet. This was apparently to start a coffee maker that had been setup the night before. I, instead, used the outlet to turn on my record player so I could wake to music of my own selection. Ten years after the premier of the Jetsons automated utopia, this was the extent of home automation available to the average consumer.

    By the late 1970s and into the 1980s, the landscape changed in consumer home automation. A Scottish electronics company conceived of a remote control system that would communicate over power lines. By the mid 1980s, the X10 system of controllers and devices was available at Radio Shack and many other stores.

    [....]

    My next blog posting will walk through the process of downloading and setting up a Mozilla Things Gateway.

  • Build your own phono preamplifier

    I was fortunate to receive a new phono cartridge for Christmas. What a lovely present! And of course, there is great pleasure (or, I suppose, great frustration, depending on one’s point of view) in all the tinkering required to remove the old phono cartridge, mount the new one, and correctly set things up.

    For some expert advice on this matter, I turned to the excellent instructional videos and articles by Michael Fremer, a vinyl enthusiast and audio journalist with many years of experience in all things phono. Rather than offer a single representative link here, I recommend searching for “Michael Fremer cartridge setup video” in your favorite search engine.

  • Atom C3000 based net appliance offers eight LAN ports

    Advantech’s FWA-1012VC follows a number of headless networking appliances that run Linux on Intel’s Atom C3000 (“Denverton”) SoC, including Aaeon’s recent FWS-2360 and Axiomtek’s NA362. The FWA-1012VC stands out from both competitors by offering more wireless expansion options.

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This under-$6 SBC runs Linux on RISC-V based C-SKY chip

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