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Fedora Core Review

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Linux
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This is the first Fedora Core review I've written, but it's not because I didn't want to write one before. I've tested every Fedora release since the very first one, and have declined to write about it because it never seemed to work properly and I don't like writing totally negative reviews.

At first I figured that the bugs and problems were just growing pains from the switchover from Red Hat Linux, and then from the move from the 2.4 to the 2.6 kernel, and other various things. There are no more excuses left, so I think it's time to break the silence about the inferiority of this desktop operating system, now in its sixth release.

The installation procedure is inferior to every other desktop GNU/Linux distribution I've used. Partitions can't be resized, the default partitioning scheme is a terrible mess involving logical volumes and groups and such, the boot loader configurator doesn't recognize other operating systems on the same computer, and trying to add extra software repositories results in an unrecoverable crash. Adding software repos after installation must be done from the command line.

Full Story.

Why Fedora isn't Ubuntu

Sigh. And so it continues.
I'm actually tired of reading "reviews" like this.

I have no problem with constructive criticism, but it seems rather than file bug reports, the standard procedure these days is to "write a scathing review on the internet". It conveniently means you don't have to bother with those boring things like details, and nicely absolves the 'reviewer' of blame for doing something unsupported.

The installation procedure is inferior to every other desktop GNU/Linux distribution I've used.

translation: "I don't like/understand lvm, and I don't like the defaults so this sucks. Oh, and I can't resize partitions"

you have to hack in the repositories that contain proprietary extras like Nvidia and ATI video drivers, the Adobe Flash and Acrobat Reader programs, the Java virtual machine, and the RealPlayer media application.

Yes. We should start shipping lots more stuff we don't have the source code for, and don't stand a chance in hell of fixing.

Full Post.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Fedora Fasttalk

I agree with the above post... about how we 'reviewers' just rant... without giving constructive criticism to the company. I must admit that I have only filed a bug report twice... and it has been a difficult process. I tried another time, and was unsucessful. I should contribute more... and so I repent.

However, I was attracted to this post because I too am writing my first Fedora review (even though it is just an installation review found here at: http://alternativenayk.wordpress.com/2007/01/23/fedora-core-6-installation-review-kde-screenshot/
)
I know there are just some opinions that I've said that I have not put forward to the company, but at least, even this discussion helps the OSS / Linux world move forward... engaging with popular opinion.
So, well... I don't have any complaints... about interface... software etc. I just have been concerned that the .iso's never worked (for me)... but now I finally bought a copy of Fedora and it does. Well... sometimes, life is like that.
Anyway... I am writing this in Fedora... and hope to use it more... before I can make my next level (work oriented) review.

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