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today's howtos

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HowTos

More in Tux Machines

Comparing Latencies and Power consumption with various CPU schedulers

The low-latency kernel offering with Ubuntu provides a kernel tuned for low-latency environments using low-latency kernel configuration options. The x86 kernels by default run with the Intel-Pstate CPU scheduler set to run with the powersave scaling governor biased towards power efficiency. While power efficiency is fine for most use-cases, it can introduce latencies due to the fact that the CPU can be running at a low frequency to save power and also switching from a deep C state when idle to a higher C state when servicing an event can also increase on latencies. Read more

csplit: A Better Way to Split File in Linux Based on its Content

Learn some practical examples of the GNU coreutils csplit command for splitting files in Linux. It’s more useful than the popular split command. Read more

today's leftovers

  • GNOME's Nautilus Port To GTK4 Making Progress
    While GTK4 likely isn't coming out until next spring, the Nautilus file manager port to this updated tool-kit is well underway. GNOME contributor Ernestas Kulik has provided an update on the porting effort of Nautilus to GTK+ 4. Nautilus is now building under GTK4 and can run, but a lot of work remains.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap Apps Website Gets Much Needed Improvements
    Canonical, Ubuntu’s parent company, is pushing aggressively for the adoption of its universal packaging system Snap. And in the same bid, it has improved the user interface and user experience of its online Snap application store. Snap applications are a new kind of s self-contained, containerized applications. They contain most of the dependencies inside it and are confined from the operating system and other applications through security mechanisms. In other words, Snaps are more secure by design but they are bigger in size and take longer to load than the regular Linux applications.
  • This Week in Lubuntu Development #7
    Here is the seventh issue of This Week in Lubuntu Development. You can read the last issue here.
  • Microsoft Is Working On Android Smartphones; Could Be Launched Soon
  • Luxoft joins Daimler in software for next-gen cars
    The centre is looking for QA Automation Engineers with expertise in Python, Manual QA Engineers with DevOps principles knowledge, Software Developers with Linux Embedded Expertise, C++, Qt and Tools and Automation Engineer, with Jenkins, Git and Unix systems knowledge
  • Global Open Source Services Market by Type, Stage, End-User

Linux Audio Conference and GUADEC

  • Linux Audio Conference Team: All videos now available
    The title says it all: We have finally finished up on the remaining videos. You can find them all either linked on the respective event pages in the schedule or in the collection of videos on media.ccc.de (linked to in the menu). Due to holidays and other things in life, releasing the few remaining videos (mainly concerts, a few workshops and the keynote) took longer than anticipated. We hope they're worth the wait and are sure you will be able to enjoy them!
  • Linux Audio Conference 2018 Videos Available For Your Enjoyment
    Taking place last month at Berlin's C-Base was the sixteenth Linux Audio Conference. The 2018 Linux Audio Conference focused on everything from different open-source sound projects to different multimedia tools and more.
  • GUADEC 2018 Almería
    I recently attended the recent GNOME Users and Developers European Conference (GUADEC) in Almería, Spain. This was my fifth GUADEC and as always I was able to attend thanks to my employer Canonical paying for me to be there. This year we had seven members of the Ubuntu desktop team present. Almería was a beautiful location for the conference and a good trade for the winter weather I left on the opposite side of the world in New Zealand.