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Red Hat and Fedora Articles/News

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Red Hat
  • Top predictions for 2018 point toward security and innovation

    When thinking about future trends, it’s important to have a strong understanding of the important innovations impacting most sectors, and pair that understanding with an intuition around what impacts those innovations will have to most organizations in 2018.

    Innovation is crucial to federal agencies, but is muted when security becomes a factor. When it comes to impactful trends in the new year, it’s all about three things: security, security, security. Despite the fact that a Ponemon Institute study recently showed that the global average cost of a data breach is down 10 percent over previous years to $3.62 million, according CSO, the average size of a data breach increased nearly two percent. This stat signifies that security will continue to be a top concern for 2018, just as it was in 2017, and will be in 2019.

  • How inner sourcing saved our IT department

    Red Hat is a company with roughly 11,000 employees. The IT department consists of roughly 500 members. Though it makes up just a fraction of the entire organization, the IT department is still sufficiently staffed to have many application service, infrastructure, and operational teams within it. Our purpose is "to enable Red Hatters in all functions to be effective, productive, innovative, and collaborative, so that they feel they can make a difference,"—and, more specifically, to do that by providing technologies and related services in a fashion that is as open as possible.

    Being open like this takes time, attention, and effort. While we always strive to be as open as possible, it can be difficult. For a variety of reasons, we don't always succeed.

  • Red Hat, Inc.’s (RHT) stock price ends at $126.16 with performance of 1.33% on volume of 2098805 shares
  • Traders Secrets on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Nutanix, Inc. (NTNX)
  • Copr Modularity in retrospect

    his article is about the journey that we made since the Fedora modularity project started and we decided to get involved and provide modularity features in Copr. It has been a long and difficult road and we are still not on its end because the whole modularity project is a living organism that is still evolving and changing. Though, we are happy to be part of it.

  • 10 Fedora Women Days across the world

    Different topics were covered during the events, not only for people already familiar with our community but especially for newcomers intrigued by the open source world and willing to join the Fedora Project. This year we presented in Guwahati, Bangalore, Tirana, Managua, Cusco, Puno, Pune, Lima, Brno and Prishtina, spreading the word about Fedora and saying thank you to all the women contributors to our project.

    Even though the events were dedicated to women, everyone of all identities were welcomed to participate or give a talk. We are glad to see how much interest there was in these events in different local communities and how successful they were, making the decision easier for us to organize them again next year.

  • The Fedora 28 Wallpaper Contest is Open for Entries

    If you’re in any way creative, and want to give something back to the Linux community, here’s your chance!

    Fedora is on the hunt for a new set of desktop wallpapers sourced from the open source community.

    The distro invites open source enthusiasts to submit their very best photographs and illustrations for possible inclusion in the add-on wallpaper pack for its next major release, Fedora 28.

  • Submit Wallpaper for Fedora 28 Supplemental Wallpaper!
  • My FLOSS​ Year in Review

    Thanks to the Fedora Project, GNOME, BacktrackAcademy and the Linux Foundation, I was able to organize FLOSS events mostly in Lima, Peru. Besides that, I did a voluntary work as speaker in FLOSS workshops and IT conference in other parts of the world, being interviewed to reach more newcomers into the challenging Linux world, and do online training.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Graphics: VC4 and AMDVLK Driver

  • VC4 display, VC5 kernel submitted
    For VC5, I renamed the kernel driver to “v3d” and submitted it to the kernel. Daniel Vetter came back right away with a bunch of useful feedback, and next week I’m resolving that feedback and continuing to work on the GMP support. On the vc4 front, I did the investigation of the HDL to determine that the OLED matrix applies before the gamma tables, so we can expose it in the DRM for Android’s color correction. Stefan was also interested in reworking his fencing patches to use syncobjs, so hopefully we can merge those and get DRM HWC support in mainline soon. I also pushed Gustavo’s patch for using the new core DRM infrastructure for async cursor updates. This doesn’t simplify our code much yet, but Boris has a series he’s working on that gets rid of a lot of custom vc4 display code by switching more code over to the new async support.
  • V3D DRM Driver Revised As It Works To Get Into The Mainline Kernel
    Eric Anholt of Broadcom has sent out his revised patches for the "V3D" DRM driver, which up until last week was known as the VC5 DRM driver. As explained last week, the VC5 driver components are being renamed to V3D since it ends up supporting more than just VC5 with Broadcom VC6 hardware already being supported too. Eric is making preparations to get this VideoCore driver into the mainline Linux kernel and he will then also rename the VC5 Gallium3D driver to V3D Gallium3D.
  • AMDVLK Driver Gets Fixed For Rise of the Tomb Raider Using Application Profiles
    With last week's release of Rise of the Tomb Raider on Linux ported by Feral Interactive, when it came to Radeon GPU support for this Vulkan-only Linux game port the Mesa RADV driver was supported while the official AMDVLK driver would lead to GPU hangs. That's now been fixed. With the latest AMDVLK/XGL source code as of today, the GPU hang issue for Rise of the Tomb Raider should now be resolved.

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Performance Boosted By Updated BIOS/AGESA

With last week's initial launch-day Linux benchmarks of the Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X some found the Linux performance to be lower than Windows. While the root cause is undetermined, a BIOS/AGESA update does appear to help the Linux performance significantly at least with the motherboard where I've been doing most of my tests with the Ryzen 7 2700X. Here are the latest benchmark numbers. Read more

GNU: The GNU C Library 2.28 and Guix on Android

  • Glibc 2.28 Upstream Will Build/Run Cleanly On GNU Hurd
    While Linux distributions are still migrating to Glibc 2.27, in the two months since the release changes have continued building up for what will eventually become the GNU C Library 2.28. The Glibc 2.28 work queued thus far isn't nearly as exciting as all the performance optimizations and more introduced with Glibc 2.27, but it's a start. Most notable at this point for Glibc 2.28 is that it will now build and run cleanly on GNU/Hurd without requiring any out-of-tree patches. There has been a ton of Hurd-related commits to Glibc over the past month.
  • Guix on Android!
    Last year I thought to myself: since my phone is just a computer running an operating system called Android (or Replicant!), and that Android is based on a Linux kernel, it's just another foreign distribution I could install GNU Guix on, right? It turned out it was absolutely the case. Today I was reminded on IRC of my attempt last year at installing GNU Guix on my phone. Hence this blog post. I'll try to give you all the knowledge and commands required to install it on your own Android device.
  • GNU Guix Wrangled To Run On Android
    The GNU Guix transactional package manager can be made to run on Android smartphones/tablets, but not without lots of hoops to jump through first.